cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

This Day In The History Of Music.

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Elvis Presley made his first public appearance as a singer on this day. It did not go well: he came fifth in a local talent show. But he was only ten years old. October 3, 1945; Chopin: The Day the Music Died The brief life of Chopin, one of music’s earliest superstars, ended on this day when the sickly composer fell victim to tuberculosis.  Source- | This Day In Music. For those who may not know. Elvis Presley was known as the King of Rock-n-Roll. 

P.S I am thinking about posting each day. If anyone in the Pandora community would like to add or suggest this post, then please do. I welcome all who are interested. Thank you. Take care everyone, and please stay safe as well.

 tenor (1).gif   

P.S. I will be using two sources of information for "This Day In The History Of Music". The first source is This Day In Music and the second source is On This Day in Music History. And for the faithful readers of this post, you probably have also noticed I use a third source when the two sources that I do use are not in agreement with the facts, the third source will always be listed. When the third source has to be used I will always list it as a (Side Note:) and it will always be highlighted in bold red just as you see it now. When I have to use a third source it will normally agree with one of the other two sources, that is when I will agree with that information, in the case where the third source also differs from the other two I will just go with the first date and information given. When this happens I will leave it up to the reader to look into the fact and or facts for that blog, and please feel free to leave a reply about any additional information you may have found, and please list the source and or sources that you used for that additional information. I try my very best to add nothing but true facts to this post, and I will always give the source that I took those facts from. When I add my own personal opinion I will do so as a side note as well, but that will be highlighted in bold blue. I do hope you enjoy reading this post, history has always been my favorite subject throughout my whole life, from grade school through college, and even to this day. 

Take care and stay safe. 

 

mod edit: format

MOHLovesAlaska
497 Replies

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

This Day In History Of Music for this Monday.

1963 - Monterey Festival: The first Monterey Folk Festival took place over three days in Monterey, California. The festival featured Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, and Peter Paul, and Mary. The 1967 Monterey Rock festival is remembered for the first major American appearances by Jimi Hendrix and The Who as well as the first major public performances of Janis Joplin. It was also the first major performance by Otis Redding in front of a predominantly white audience.

1964 - Bob Dylan: made his first major concert UK appearance when he played at the Royal Festival Hall in London with an afternoon show listed as a ‘Folksong Concert’. Dylan's 18-song set included the live debut of Mr. Tambourine Man and took place on a Sunday afternoon. In the interval, Dylan received a telegram from John Lennon seeking a meeting which never materialized.  

1966 - Bob Dylan: During a UK tour, Bob Dylan appeared at The Free Trade Hall in Manchester. This was the concert where a member of the audience shouted out ‘Judas’ at Dylan unhappy with the singer's move from acoustic to rock. Dylan replied with ‘You’re a liar, the entire concert was eventually officially released in The Bootleg Series by Sony Music in 1999.  

1967 - The Beatles: Working at Abbey Road studios The Beatles began recording a new John Lennon song ‘You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)’. The song was not finished until November 1969 and was not released until March 1970 (as the B-side of the ‘Let it Be’ single).  

1967 - Glen Campbell: Working at the Capitol Recording Studio in Hollywood, Glen Campbell recorded 'Gentle On My Mind,' a song written by John Hartford and arranged by Leon Russell. The song went on to win won four Grammy Awards the following year and became the theme to the television variety show, The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour between 1969 and 1972.  

1967 - The Tremeloes: were at No.1 on the UK singles chart with their version of a Four Seasons song, (the B-side to Rag Doll), 'Silence Is Golden', the group's only UK No.1.  

1969 - Album Sales: It was reported that for the first time ever album sales had overtaken single sales in the UK. 49,184,000 albums were produced during 1968 compared with 49,161,000 singles.  

1971 - Dawn: was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Knock Three Times', the group's first of two UK No.1's. Singer Tony Orlando had retired from singing when he was persuaded to front Dawn for studio recordings. 

1975 - Elton John: was awarded a Platinum Record for sales of a million copies of the LP 'Captain Fantastic and The Brown Dirt Cowboy, the first album ever to be certified Platinum on the day of its release.  

1975 - Led Zeppelin: played the first of five sold-out nights to 17,000 fans at Earls Court Arena, London England. The setlist included: Rock And Roll, The Song Remains The Same, The Rain Song, Kashmir, No Quarter, Going To California, Dazed And Confused, Stairway To Heaven, Whole Lotta Love, and Black Dog. Tickets cost £1 ($1.70) - £2.50 ($4.25).  

1986 - Spitting Image: started a three-week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'The Chicken Song.' Spitting Image had become the 'must see' Sunday night UK TV show, which mocked politicians and public figures.  

1986 - Whitney Houston: started a three-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Greatest Love Of All', the singer's third US No.1, a No.8 hit in the UK.  

1987 - Tom Petty: A fire destroyed Tom Petty's house in Los Angeles, the cost was estimated at $800,000.  

1990 - Nirvana: played the last date of a North American tour at the Zoo in Boise, Idaho. This was Chad Channing's final gig with the band, drummer Dave Grohl replaced him in Sept of this year after his band Scream had split up.

1996 - Johnny Guitar Watson: US blues guitarist Johnny Guitar Watson died of a heart attack while on tour in Yokohama, Japan. According to eyewitness reports, he collapsed mid guitar solo. His last words were "ain't that a **ahem**." His ferocious 'Space Guitar' single of 1954 pioneered guitar feedback and reverb.

1996 - Kevin Gilbert: multi-instrumentalist and songwriter, died of accidental asphyxiation. Member of Giraffe, worked with Sheryl Crow, co-wrote her 1994 UK No.4 hit 'All I Want To Do.'

2002 - Sharon Sheeley:  US songwriter, died aged 62. Hits include 'Poor Little Fool' US No.1 for Ricky Nelson in 1958 and 1959 hit for Eddie Cochran 'Somethin' Else'. Sheeley survived the car crash that killed Eddie Cochran during a 1960 UK tour.

2003 - Scott Weiland: Singer with Stone Temple Pilots, Scott Weiland, was arrested on suspicion of drug possession after being stopped during a routine traffic search in Los Angeles, He was released on $10,000 (£6,125) bail.

2006 - Paul McCartney: and his wife Heather Mills admitted that they had given up the fight to save their marriage, saying that after four years together, they were going their separate ways.

2008 - Amy Winehouse and Pete Doherty: posted a two-minute clip of themselves playing with newborn mice on Youtube. The video showed Doherty and Winehouse in a bare room, making rambling comments, picking up the mice, and talking to them.

2012 - Donna Summer: the 1970s pop singer known as the Queen of Disco, died of lung cancer, an illness she believed she contracted from inhaling toxic particles released after the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York. She won five Grammy Awards, six American Music Awards, and had three multi-platinum albums, including the hits 'Hot Stuff', 'Love to Love You, and 'Baby' and 'I Feel Love'.

2013 - Daft Punk: French Electronic Duo Daft Punk released their fourth album Random Access Memories. It would debut at No.1 on both the US and UK charts and go on to win five Grammy Awards, including Album of the Year.

2013 - Bob Dylan: was made an honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Dylan, who was unable to attend the New York ceremony, said he felt "extremely honored" and "lucky" to be admitted. Dylan's induction was decided by a vote of the Academy's 250 members.

2015 - Chinx: Rapper Chinx was shot and killed in Queens, New York. The 31-year-old, who was part of French Montana's Coke Boys group, was riding in a car in the early hours of the morning when another vehicle pulled up and opened fire. He was hit in the torso and chest and died later at a Queens hospital.

2016 - Guy Clark: American Texas country and folk singer, songwriter Guy Clark died in Nashville following a lengthy battle with lymphoma. He wrote songs for Johnny Cash, Ricky Skaggs, Jerry Jeff Walker, Jimmy Buffett, Lyle Lovett, and many other artists.

2016 - Alanis Morissette: sued her former manager for fraud saying she was robbed of almost $5m (£3.5m) by her former business manager. In papers filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, the singer claimed Jonathan Schwartz transferred money to his own accounts without permission. Schwartz said the transfers were made to fund an "investment" in a marijuana-growing business for the singer, and to avoid extra trips to the bank because Morissette "spends a lot of cash".

2019 - Eric Moore: lead singer of Ohio-based biker rock group The Godz died after a battle with bladder cancer age 67. The Godz had toured with acts including Kiss, Cheap Trick, Judas Priest, Blue Öyster Cult, and Iggy Pop.

Born On This Day In The Music World: 

1941 - Malcolm Hale: from American 1960s sunshine pop band Spanky And Our Gang, who had the 1967 US No.9 single 'Sunday Will Never Be The Same Again'. Hale died on 31st October 1968 of carbon monoxide poisoning due to a faulty heater.

1942 - Taj Mahal: US multi-instrumentalist, composer of film soundtracks. In the early 60s, he formed The Rising Sons with Ry Cooder, one of the first interracial bands of the period. Mahal has worked with Howlin' Wolf, Buddy Guy, Lightnin' Hopkins, Garth Hudson and Levon Helm of The Band, and Muddy Waters.

1944 - Jesse Winchester: Canadian folk singer, songwriter. His songs have been covered by many artists including Patti Page, Elvis Costello, Jimmy Buffett, Joan Baez, Anne Murray, Reba McEntire, The Everly Brothers, and Emmylou Harris. He died on April 11, 2014.

1948 - Bill Bruford: English drummer. He was the original drummer for the progressive rock group Yes, from 1968–1972, and then joined King Crimson. He worked as the touring drummer for Genesis in 1976 and U.K. in 1978.

1953 - George Johnson: from American funk, Motown, and R&B band Brothers Johnson. They achieved their greatest success from the mid-1970s to early 1980s, with three singles topping the R&B charts ('I'll Be Good to You', 'Strawberry Letter 23' and 'Stomp!'.

1958 - Alan Rankine: keyboardist, guitarist from The Associates who had the 1982 UK No.9 single 'Party Fears Two.

1959 - Paul Dianno: vocals, the first vocalist to record with heavy metal band Iron Maiden, from 1978 to 1981. Di'Anno has issued numerous albums over the years, as both a solo artist and as a member of such bands as Gogmagog, Di'Anno's Battlezone, Praying Mantis, Killers, and Rockefellas.

1960 - Simon Fuller: record and television producer, manager of the Spice Girls, S Club 7, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood, Chris Daughtry, Fantasia, Will Young, Emma Bunton, and Gareth Gates and the creator of the Idol series. First seen as Pop Idol, and now with over 50 other versions, including American Idol, Canadian Idol, and World Idol.

1961 - Enya: Enya Ni Bhraonain, from Irish family band Clannad who had the 1982 UK No.5 single 'Harry's Game'. Enya had the solo, 1988 UK No.1 single 'Orinoco Flow', and the 2001 US No.2 album 'A Day Without Rain'. Enya is Ireland's biggest selling solo artist and second overall behind U2 with an estimated 75 million records sold worldwide.

1963 - Page Samuel McConnell: pianist, organist, keyboardist, from American rock band Phish who is known for musical improvisation, extended jams, and blending of genres.

1965 - Trent Reznor: American singer-songwriter, record producer, and member of Nine Inch Nails, (2005 US No.1 album 'White Teeth'). He and his wife, Mariqueen Maandig, are members of the post-industrial group How to Destroy Angels. Reznor with Atticus Ross scored the David Fincher films The Social Network (2010), The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), and Gone Girl (2014), winning the Academy Award for Best Original Score for The Social Network and the Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

1966 - Jan Kincaid: from English group The Brand New Heavies, who had the 1994 UK No.13 single with their version of 'Midnight At The Oasis'.

1967 - Simon Friend: guitarist with English folk-rock band The Levellers who had the 1995 UK No.12 single 'Just The One.

1968 - Dave Abbruzzese: American drummer with Pearl Jam from 1991 to 1994. In 1997, Abbruzzese rehearsed with Axl Rose during the making of Guns N' Roses' 2008 album, Chinese Democracy. However, none of the material from the sessions ended up on the album.

1970 - Jordan Knight: singer, from American boy band New Kids On The Block, who had the 1989 UK No.1 single 'You Got It, The Right Stuff', and the 1990 US No.1 single 'Step By Step'. They enjoyed success in the late 1980s and early 1990s and have sold more than 80 million records worldwide.

1971 - Vernie Bennett: from British R&B girl group Eternal who had the 1997 UK No.1 single 'I Wanna Be The Only One', and the 1993 UK No.2 album Always & Forever. They achieved 15 UK Top 20 hits between 1993 and 1999.

1973 - Josh Homme: American rock musician, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer, Josh Homme, founding and only continuous member of Queens of the Stone Age. He formed Eagles of Death Metal in 1998. In 2009, he formed Them Crooked Vultures with Dave Grohl and John Paul Jones. In 2016, he released Post Pop Depression, an album with Iggy Pop.

1974 - Andrea Corr: singer, tin whistle, piano with Irish group The Corrs. Had the 1998 UK No.3 single 'What Can I Do' and their 'Talk On Corners' was the best selling UK album of 1998, spending 142 weeks on the UK chart. Andrea released her debut album, Ten Feet High, in 2007. Along with her siblings, she was appointed an honorary M.B.E. in 2005.

1984 - Passenger: English singer-songwriter Michael David Rosenberg, better known by his stage name Passenger. His most successful single, "Let Her Go", topped the charts in many countries. In 2014 the song was nominated for the Brit Award for British Single of the Year.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Tuesday afternoon, and I do hope your Tuesday has been treating you very well thus far. Let's get down to business, shall we? This Day In History Of Music for this Tuesday. 

 

1964 - The Rolling Stones: A riot broke out in Hamilton, Scotland during a Rolling Stones UK tour when over 4,000 fans with forged tickets gate-crashed the bands' gig at the Chantingall Hotel.

1966 - Bruce Springsteen: The Castiles (with Bruce Springsteen on vocals), made their first recordings at Mr. Music Inc in Brick Town, New Jersey. They cut two Springsteen songs, ‘Baby I’ and ‘That’s What You Get’. The songs were cut directly to disc, of which seven or eight test pressings of the studio takes were made.

1966 - Bob Dylan and Robbie Robertson: During his 1966 world tour, Bob Dylan and Robbie Robertson from The Band were filmed singing several songs in a hotel room in Glasgow, Scotland, the footage turning up in the film Eat The Document. The film was originally commissioned for the ABC television series Stage '66, but after Dylan edited the film himself ABC rejected it as 'incomprehensible for a mainstream audience'.

1967 - The Beatles: were selected to represent the UK for the first-ever global-wide satellite broadcast. The group agreed to be shown in the studio recording a song written especially for the occasion, scheduled for June 25. John Lennon wrote ‘All You Need is Love’ which was thought to sum up the 1967 'summer of love' and The Beatles' sympathies. With the satellite broadcast being broadcast to many non-English-speaking countries, the BBC asked The Beatles to 'keep it simple'.

1967 - Pink Floyd: started recording their forthcoming single 'See Emily Play' at Sound Techniques Studios, Chelsea, London. Syd Barrett was inspired to write See Emily Play, by the ‘looking about’ of the early Pink Floyd fan Emily Young, (who is now a renowned sculptor). Guitarist David Gilmour, playing gigs in France with his own band in that period, visited Floyd in the studio during a trip to London.

1968 - Miami Pop: The first Miami Pop event took place with an estimated 100,000 people attending the concert, which was promoted by Richard O'Barry & Michael Lang (later famous as the promoter of Woodstock). Bands featured at the festival included Steppenwolf, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Mothers of Invention, Blue Cheer, Chuck Berry, The Blues Image, Pacific Gas and Electric, Three Dog Night, and the Crazy World of Arthur Brown.

1974 - Ray Stevens: started a three-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with the novelty song 'The Streak' which capitalized on the then-popular craze of streaking. Also No.1 in the UK.

1975 - Tammy Wynette: Five times married US country singer, Tammy Wynette was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Stand By Your Man.' Originally released as a single in 1968 in the USA. It proved to be the most successful record of Wynette's career and is one of the most covered songs in the history of country music.

1980 - Ian Curtis: Joy Division singer and guitarist Ian Curtis hanged himself in the kitchen of his house in Macclesfield, England at the age of 23. Curtis had the Iggy Pop album 'The Idiot', playing on his stereo and left a note that said, 'At this very moment, I wish I were dead. I just can't cope anymore.' Joy Division released the critically acclaimed debut album Unknown Pleasures in 1979 and recorded their follow-up 'Closer' in 1980.

1985 - Simple Minds: were at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Don't You Forget About Me', (a No. 7 hits in the UK). Written by Keith Forsey (who won an Oscar for "Flashdance... What a Feeling") and Steve Schiff (guitarist and songwriter from the Nina Hagen band), the track was featured in the 1985 American teen drama film The Breakfast Club.

1993 - Janet Jackson: released Janet. The album’s first-week sales of 350,000 were the highest for a female artist at that time. The album went on to sell over 14 million copies worldwide. It’s one of only seven albums to have Six Top Ten Hits on the Billboard Hot 100 charts.

1997 - Robbie Williams: Blur won pop music's equivalent of the FA Cup, the Music Industry Soccer Six. The band's win at Fulham's FC's ground Craven Cottage saw them beating off competition from Robbie Williams, My Life Story, and The Prodigy.

2000 - Madonna: boyfriend Guy Ritchie was arrested after attacking a fan outside the superstar's London home. Ritchie was said to have kicked and punched a male fan after the couple returned home from a night out.

2004 - Clint Warwick: the original bass player with The Moody Blues died from liver disease at the age of 63. Clint left the band in 1966 after playing on their only number one hit, 'Go Now'.

2008 - Ting Tings: scored their first UK No.1 single with 'That's Not My Name'. Taken from the Manchester duo's debut studio album 'We Started Nothing.

2011 - The Beatles: John Lennon's handwritten lyrics for the 1967 Beatles song 'Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds' sold for $237,132 (£145,644) at an auction in the US. The sale of the sheet, which featured the song's third verse and the opening words to 'She's Leaving Home', took place at the Saban Theatre in Beverly Hills. Both songs feature on the 1967 album Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It was speculated the song was about the drug LSD, however, The Beatles denied this, with Lennon saying the inspiration had come from a picture his son Julian had drawn of a classmate named Lucy Vodden - who died of the immune system disease Lupus in 2009.

2017 - Chris Cornell: American musician, singer, and songwriter Chris Cornell died suddenly in Detroit after performing at a show with Soundgarden. Cornell was known for his role as one of the architects of the 1990s grunge movement, and for his near four-octave vocal range as well as his powerful vocal belting technique. He released four solo studio albums as well as working with Audioslave and Temple of the Dog.

2017 - The Killers: It was announced that The Killers' 'Mr. Brightside' was the most-streamed song released before 2010 in the UK. 2004 single was streamed 26 million times last year, beating any other song released before 2010, according to music industry body the BPI.

2019 - Melvin Edmonds: R&B singer Melvin Edmonds died at the age of 65. He was a member of the group After 7 and the brother of Kenny 'Babyface' Edmonds. After 7 scored the hits 'Can't Stop,' 'Ready or Not' and 'Heat of the Moment.'

2019 - Kurt Cobain: A sweater worn by Kurt Cobain during the singer’s last photo-shoot with Nirvana sold for $75,000 at a New York auction. Also sold for $23,000 was Nirvana’s handwritten setlist from an April 1990 concert in Washington, D.C., which Cobain wrote with black marker on a paper plate. Cobain had eaten some pizza before the show and preceded to write the setlist on the plate he had been eating his pizza on.

Born On This Day In The Music World: 

1911 - Joe Turner: (best known as Big Joe Turner), US blues songwriter. He wrote 'Sweet Sixteen' and was the first to record 'Shake, Rattle and Roll'. Turner died on 23rd November 1985 at the age of 74 of heart failure, having suffered the earlier effects of arthritis, a stroke, and diabetes, and was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987.

1912 - Perry Como: American singer and television personality Perry Como, who had the 1957 US No.1 single 'Round And Round' and the 1958 UK No.1 single 'Magic Moments'). Como has the distinction of having three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work in radio, television, and music. He died on 12th May 2001 at age 88.

1942 - Albert Hammond: Gibraltarian singer, songwriter, and record producer. In 1966 Hammond co-founded the British vocal group the Family Dogg, scoring a UK Top 10 hit with "A Way of Life" in 1969. As a solo artist he scored the 1972 US No.5 single 'It Never Rains In Southern California', and the 1973 UK No.19 single 'Free Electric Band'. Other hits Hammond has written with collaborator Mike Hazlewood include "Little Arrows" for Leapy Lee, "Gimme Dat Ding" for the Pipkins, and "The Air That I Breathe" which was a hit for the Hollies.

1946 - George Alexander: from American rock band Flamin Groovies who had the 1976 album 'Shake Some Action. In addition to the band's role in the advancement of power pop, the Flamin' Groovies have also been called one of the forerunners of punk rock.

1949 - Rick Wakeman: English keyboardist, songwriter, television and radio presenter. As a session musician, his early sessions included playing on "Space Oddity", for David Bowie and songs by Junior's Eyes, T. Rex, Elton John, and Cat Stevens. Wakeman became a member of Strawbs and then the classic line-up in Yes. As a solo artist, he scored the 1974 UK No.1 album 'Journey To The Centre Of The Earth'.

1949 - William Wallace: from Canadian rock band Guess Who who had the 1970 US No.1 & UK No.19 single 'American Woman'.

1950 - Mark Mothersbaugh: American musician Mark Mothersbaugh, co-founder of the new wave band Devo. His other musical projects include work for television series, films, and video games. Devo had a No. 14 Billboard chart hit in 1980 with the single 'Whip It'.

1952 - George Strait: American country music singer, songwriter, actor George Strait. His 1992 album Pure Country spent 40 weeks on the US chart. He has the second-most No.1 country hits among any artist in any musical genre in history, totaling 53 No.1 hit songs. Only Conway Twitty has more, with 55. Strait has sold more than 100 million records worldwide.

1953 - Butch Tavares: from American R&B, funk, and soul group Tavares, who had the 1976 UK No.4 and US No.15 single 'Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel'.

1954 - Wreckless Eric: (Eric Goulden), English singer, songwriter, and Stiff Records artist who had the 1978 UK airplay hit 'Whole Wide World'.

1956 - Jim Moginie: founding member, guitarist, keyboardist, and songwriter with Midnight Oil. Moginie has worked with many notable musicians from Australia and New Zealand, including Silverchair, Sarah Blasko, End of Fashion, Neil Murray, Kasey Chambers, and Neil Finn.

1957 - Michael Cretu; Romanian-German musician and produce Michael Cretu who as Enigma had the 1991 UK No.1 & US No.5 single 'Sadness Part 1'. Enigma has sold over 70 million worldwide.

1958 - Toyah: (Victoria Wilcox), English singer and actress, who scored the 80s hits 'It's a Mystery, 'Thunder in the Mountains' and 'I Want to Be Free'. Toyah has released over 20 albums, written two books, appeared in over forty stage plays and ten feature films. Willcox married Robert Fripp of King Crimson in 1986.

1961 - Hugh Whittaker: from English alternative rock band The Housemartins. The group's Cappella cover version of 'Caravan of Love' (originally by Isley-Jasper-Isley) was a UK No.1 single in December 1986.

1961 - Russell Senior: guitarist with English rock band Pulp, who had the 1995 UK No.2 single 'Common People. He quit the band in January 1997. Pulp was regarded among the Britpop "big four", along with Oasis, Blur, and Suede.

1967 - Martin Duffy: English keyboardist Martin Duffy, who originally played in Felt and currently plays with Primal Scream. Duffy also played with The Charlatans following the death of founder-member Rob Collins.

1969 - Martika: American singer-songwriter and actress. Her biggest hit was 'Toy Soldiers' which peaked at No.1 for two weeks in the US in mid-1989.

1975 - Jack Johnson: Hawaii-born singer, songwriter, a surfer who scored the 2006 UK No.1 album 'In Between Dreams, and the 2006 US & Australian No.1 album ‘Sing-A-Longs and Lullabies for the Film Curious George'. He is also known for organizing an annual event, the Kōkua Festival.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe.  

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Wednesday morning, here is what happened on This Day In The History Of Music for this Wednesday. Have a great and joyous day, and if you feel as though it is unachievable at least try. 

1949 - Larry Wallis: English guitarist, songwriter, and producer Larry Wallis best known as a member of the Pink Fairies and an early member of Motörhead. Wallis died on 19 September 2019 aged 70.

1960 - Alan Freed: American DJ Alan Freed was indicted along with seven others for accepting $30,650 in payola from six record companies. Two years later, he was convicted and given a suspended sentence and a $300 fine.

1967 - The Beatles: held a press party at manager's Brian Epstein's house in London for the launch of the Sgt. Pepper album. Linda Eastman was hired as the press photographer for the event.

1973 - Stevie Wonder: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'You Are The Sunshine Of My Life. His third US No.1, won Wonder a Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. This song was the second single released from the album 'Talking Book'.

1973 - Paul Simon: released the single 'Kodachrome' named after the Kodak 35mm film Kodachrome which became a No.2 hit in the US. It was not released as a single in Britain, because the BBC would not play the trademarked name.

1976 - Keith Richards: Rolling Stone Keith Richards crashed his car near Newport Pagnell, Bucks, after falling asleep at the wheel; marijuana and cocaine were found by the police resulting in another fine for the guitarist.

1978 - Dire Straits: released their first major-label single 'Sultans Of Swing', recorded on a £120 budget. The song was first recorded as a demo at Pathway Studios, North London, in July 1977, and quickly acquired a following after it was put on rotation at Radio London.

1979 - Abba: started a four-week run at No.1 on the UK album chart with 'Voulez-Vous' the group's fourth No.1 album.

1979 - Eric Clapton: held a party at his Surrey house celebrating his recent marriage to Patti Boyd. Clapton had set up a small stage in the garden and as the evening progressed, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr ended up jamming together along with Clapton, Ginger Baker, and Mick Jagger. The all-star band ran through old Little Richard and Eddie Cochran songs.

1979 - Supertramp: went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Breakfast In America', the group's only US No.1. It featured three US Billboard hit singles: 'The Logical Song', 'Goodbye Stranger and 'Take the Long Way Home.

1980 - Ringo Starr: and his future wife were involved in a car crash less than half a mile from where Marc Bolan was killed, the car was a write-off but Starr and Bach were not seriously injured.

1984 - Bob Marley: and the Wailers started a 12-week run at No.1 on the UK album chart with the compilation album 'Legend', released to commemorate the third anniversary of Marley's death.

1988 - James Brown: was arrested for the fifth time in 12 months, following a car chase near his home, he was charged with assault, resisting arrest, and being in charge of illegal weapons, he was given a 6 year jail sentence.

1990 - Madonna: started a three-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Vogue'. Originally planned as a B-side, it became the singers' eighth US No.1 and seventh UK No.1 hit.

2001 - Mike Sammes: founder of The Mike Sammes Singers died aged 73. He worked with Tom Jones, Cliff Richard and featured on The Beatles, ‘I Am The Walrus’ and 'The Long And Winding Road.'

2007 - Michael Jackson: Lawyers for Michael Jackson dropped an effort to block an auction of the star's personal belongings and other Jackson family items. An agreement was reached with representatives of an auctioneer, who was the current owner of the materials, and a New Jersey man who claimed to own a warehouse full of Jackson memorabilia after a failed business venture wound up in bankruptcy court.

2010 - Led Zeppelin: 'Stairway To Heaven' was named the UK's favorite rock song in a survey by listeners to radio station Absolute Classic Rock. Led Zeppelin had two other tracks in the top 10; ‘Whole Lotta Love’ was voted at No. 4 and ‘Rock 'n' Roll’, from the group’s fourth album, was at No. 7.

2013 - John Lennon and George Harrison: A guitar played by John Lennon and George Harrison sold for $408,000 (£269,000) at auction. The custom-made instrument, built-in 1966 by VOX was bought by an unidentified US buyer in New York. Harrison played ‘I Am The Walrus’, on the guitar in a scene from Magical Mystery Tour in 1967. Lennon used it in a video for Hello, Goodbye later that year. After playing the guitar, Lennon gave it as a 25th birthday present to Alexis "Magic Alex" Mardas, a member of The Beatles' inner circle in the 1960s.

2015 - Lee Ryan: became the fourth and final member of Blue to declare himself bankrupt. Lee became the last member of the chart-topping boyband - who earned more than £80million after selling in excess of 15million records worldwide - to file for bankruptcy, following in the financial footsteps of his bandmates Simon Webbe, Antony Costa, and Duncan James.

2016 - John Berry: a founding member of rap group Beastie Boys died at the age of 52. Berry originally formed the four-piece hardcore punk band, the Young Aborigines, in 1978 who later became the Beastie Boys and came up with the name for the group.

2018 - Reggie Lucas: American musician, songwriter, and record producer Reggie Lucas died aged 65. Lucas is best known for having produced the majority of Madonna's 1983 self-titled debut album, and for playing with Billy Paul and Miles Davis electric band of the first half of the 1970s.

Born On This Day In The Music World

1932 - Alma Cogan: English singer of traditional pop music who had the 1955 UK No.1 single 'Dreamboat', plus 20 other UK Top 40 hits. She was the youngest female to top the charts during the 50s and the highest paid British female entertainer of her era. Cogan died of stomach cancer on 26th October 1966 age 34.

1945 - Pete Townshend: English musician, singer, songwriter Pete Townshend, The Who. Had the 1965 UK No.2 single 'My Generation' and the 1967 US No.9 single 'I Can See For Miles' plus over 20 other UK Top 40 hit singles, 16 US Top 40 singles, and rock opera albums 'Tommy' & 'Quadrophenia'. Townshend became known for his eccentric stage style swinging his right arm against the guitar strings in a windmill style, often smashing guitars on stage. Although known primarily as a guitarist, he also plays keyboards, banjo, accordion, harmonica, ukulele, mandolin, violin, synthesizer, bass guitar, and drums.

1947 - Greg Herbert: from jazz-rock American music group Blood Sweat & Tears. They scored the 1969 US No.2 single 'Spinning Wheel', and the 1969 US No.12 single 'You've Made Me So Very Happy. They had a US No.1 with their second album Blood, Sweat & Tears in 1968. Herbert died of an accidental drug overdose on 31st January 1977.

1947 - Jerry Hyman: from jazz-rock American music group Blood Sweat & Tears. They scored the 1969 US No.2 single 'Spinning Wheel', and the 1969 US No.12 single 'You've Made Me So Very Happy. They had a US No.1 with their second album Blood, Sweat & Tears in 1968.

1948 - Grace Jones: Jamaican singer, songwriter, supermodel Grace Jones, who scored the 1985 UK No.12 single 'Slave To The Rhythm' and the hit 'Pull Up to the Bumper'.

1948 - Tom Scott: saxophonist, the L.A. Express worked with Joni Mitchell, Carole King, Steely Dan. Composer of film soundtracks & TV shows.

1949 - Dusty Hill: bass, keyboardist, and co-vocalist with ZZ Top, who had the 1984 US No.8 and 1985 UK No.16 single 'Legs'. ZZ Top has had global album sales in excess of 50 million as of 2014. Along with his brother Rocky Hill and future fellow ZZ Top member Frank Beard, Hill played in local Dallas bands the Warlocks, the Cellar Dwellers, and American Blues.

1950 - Mike Wedgwood: English bassist and singer Mike Wedgwood who with Curved Air had the 1971 UK No.4 single 'Back Street Luv'. He has also worked with Kiki Dee and Caravan.

1950 - Romeo Challenger: from English revival group Showaddywaddy who had the 1976 UK No.1 single with their version of 'Under The Moon Of Love'. Showaddywaddy spent 209 weeks on the UK Singles Chart and had 10 Top Ten singles.

1952 - Joey Ramone: Jeffrey Hyman, (Joey Ramone), from American punk rock band Ramones who had the 1977 hit single 'Sheena Is A Punk Rocker'. They are often cited as the first band to define the punk rock sound. He died on 15th April 2001 after losing a long battle with lymphatic cancer aged 49. On November 30, 2003, a block of East 2nd Street in New York City was officially renamed Joey Ramone Place.

1954 - Philip Rudd: drums, AC/DC, from 1975 through 1983, and again from 1994 to 2015. Their 1980 UK No.1 & US No.14 album Back In Black has sold over 49 million copies). On 6 November 2014 Rudd was arrested and charged with attempting to procure a murder, threatening to kill, possession of methamphetamine, and possession of cannabis, following a police raid on his home.

1956 - Martyn Ware: English musician Martyn Ware who with Heaven 17 had the 1983 UK No.2 single 'Temptation'. He was also a member of the Human League. As a record producer, he helped to revitalize Tina Turner's career in 1983 with 'Let's Stay Together, and also kick-started Terence Trent D'Arby's career by co-producing his solo debut, Introducing the Hardline According to...

1960 - Yazz: British pop singer, Yasmin Evans, (Yazz), who scored the 1988 UK No.1 dance track 'The Only Way Is Up'.

1962 - Iain Harvie: guitarist, from Scottish alternative rock band Del Amitri who had the 1990 UK No.11 single 'Nothing Ever Happens'. The band has had five Top 10 albums in the UK.

1963 - Ben Volperliere: singer from British pop band, Curiosity Killed The Cat who had the 1989 UK No.14 single 'Name And Number' and the UK No.1 album Keep Your Distance.

1968 - Paul Hartnoll: from English electronic dance music duo Orbital, who had the 1996 UK No.11 single 'The Box'. The band's name is taken from Greater London's orbital motorway, the M25.

1970 - Attrell Cordes: Prince Be, from American hip hop act PM Dawn who scored the 1991 US No.1 & UK No.3 single 'Set Adrift On Memory Bliss. He died on June 17, 2016, of renal disease, caused by complications of diabetes, at the age of 46 at a hospital in Neptune City, New Jersey.

1970 - Stuart Cable: drummer from Welsh rock band, Stereophonics, who had the 2001 UK No.5 single 'Have A Nice Day. Cable left the band in 2003. Presented his own Cable TV show in Wales and worked for BBC Radio Wales. Cable was found dead at his home near Aberdare in Wales on 7th June 2010 aged 40.

1972 - Jenny Berggren: singer, songwriter, with Swedish pop group Ace Of Base who had the 1993 UK No.1 single 'All That She Wants' and the 1994 US No.1 single 'The Sign'. The group sold more than 30 million albums worldwide, making it the third-most successful Swedish band of all time, after ABBA and Roxette.

1992 - Sam Smith: British singer-songwriter. He featured on Naughty Boy's 'La La La' which was a UK No.1 in May 2013 and scored the 2014 UK No.1 single 'Stay with Me', and won four Grammy Awards in 2015.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Thursday afternoon, (at least for about half the country) the other half, good Thursday morning. Here is what happened on This Day In The History Of Music. Have a great day. 

1957 - Andy Williams: American crooner Andy Williams was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Butterfly', the US singers only UK No.1 and the first of 40 hit singles from 1957 until 2002 on the UK chart.

1960 - The Beatles: The Silver Beetles (John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Stu Sutcliffe, and Tommy Moore) played the first night of a short tour of Scotland backing singer Johnny Gentle, at Alloa Town Hall in Clackmannanshire. Three of the Silver Beetles adopted stage names: Paul McCartney became Paul Ramon, George Harrison was Carl Harrison, and Stuart Sutcliffe became Stuart de Stael.

1964 - Rudy Lewis: of The Drifters died aged 28 under mysterious circumstances the night before the group was set to record 'Under the Boardwalk'. Former Drifters backup singer Johnny Moore was brought back to perform lead vocals for the recording session.

1966 - The Who: Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey of The Who grew tired of waiting for John Entwistle and Keith Moon to arrive for their gig at the Ricky Tick Club in Windsor, England so they took to the stage with the bass player and drummer of the local band that opened the show. When Moon and Entwistle finally arrived in the middle of the set, a fight broke out, with Townshend hitting Moon on the head with his guitar. Moon and Entwistle quit the band, (and rejoined a week later).

1966 - Bob Dylan and The Band: played at the ABC Theatre in Edinburgh, Scotland. Some members of the audience were unhappy with Dylan ‘going electric’, and attempted to overpower the band by playing their own harmonicas.

1967 - Kenny Everett: The Beatles new album Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band had a special preview on the Kenny Everett BBC Light program, 'Where It's At', playing every track from the album, (except 'A Day In The Life' which the BBC had banned saying it could promote drug-taking).

1967 - The Young Rascals: started a two-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Groovin', also a No.8 hit in the UK. The group named themselves after a US comedy TV show. 'Groovin' was also covered by Booker T. & the M.G.'s, Gladys Knight & the Pips, and Marvin Gaye.

1968 - David Bowie: BBC 2 TV aired a short play 'The Pistol Shot', featuring a young dancer - an artist called David Bowie.

1968 - The Beatles: armed with a bunch of new songs after their visit to India, met at George Harrison's home in Esher, Surrey. They taped 23 new songs on George's 4-track recorder, many of which would end up on The Beatles' next two albums, (The White Album) and Abbey Road. The demos include: ‘Cry Baby Cry’, Revolution’, ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’, ‘Blackbird’ and ‘Child of Nature’ (a Lennon song that became ‘Jealous Guy’).

1969 - Led Zeppelin: started three days of recording and mixing sessions at A&R Studios in New York City, which included the recording of 'Heartbreaker' and various other parts for new tracks for the group's forthcoming second album. The band was under pressure to finish sessions for their second album so they could release it in time for the Autumn market.

1970 - The Beatles: Let It Be, the final feature film involving The Beatles was premiered simultaneously in London and Liverpool a week after the film's US release.

1972 - T Rex: were at No.1 on the UK singles chart 'Metal Guru', the group's fourth and final No.1. They also had the UK No.1 album with 'Bolan Boogie.

1978 - Paul McCartney: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'With A Little Luck', his sixth solo US No.1.

1978 - Buddy Holly: The Buddy Holly story film was premiered in Holly's hometown, of Lubbock, Texas. The film features an Oscar-nominated lead performance by Gary Busey.

1989 - Holly Johnson: Ferry 'Cross The Mersey' by Ferry Aid started a three-week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart. The song was recorded to raise funds for the Hillsborough Football victims, Gerry Marsden, Paul McCartney, Holly Johnson, and The Christians all featured on the recording.

1995 - Robson and Jerome: Robson Green and Jerome Flynn started a seven-week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with their versions of 'Unchained Melody' (There'll Be Blue Birds Over) The White Cliffs Of Dover'. Actors Green and Flynn had performed the song in the UK drama series Soldier Soldier.

1995 - Don Henley: from the Eagles married model Sharon Summerall. Guests included Glenn Frey, Joe Walsh, Timothy B. Schmit, David Crosby, Randy Newman, Jimmy Buffett, Jackson Browne, Billy Joel, Sting, and Sheryl Crow.

1997 - Foo Fighters: released their second album 'The Colour And The Shape', the album was a Grammy nominee for Best Rock Album in 1998. Even though Foo Fighters are an American band, the word 'Colour' in the album title is always spelled with the British spelling. This was a nod to producer Gil Norton, who is British.

1997 - U2: caused traffic chaos in Kansas City, Missouri after they paid for traffic control to close down five lanes so they could shoot the video for 'Last Night On Earth. Apart from major traffic jams, a passing Cadillac crashed into a plate glass window trying to avoid a cameraman.

1998 - Frank Sinatra: The funeral of Frank Sinatra was held at the Church of the Good Shepherd in Beverly Hills. Mourners in attendance included Tony Bennett, Faye Dunaway, Tony Curtis, Liza Minnelli, Kirk Douglas, Angie Dickinson, Sophia Loren, Bob Newhart, Mia Farrow, and Jack Nicholson.

1998 - Tommy Lee: from Motley Crue was sentenced to six months jail after being found guilty of spousal abuse.

1998 - Black Sabbath: drummer Bill Ward was taken to hospital in London after suffering a heart attack during a band rehearsal.

2003 - James Brown: Soul singer James Brown was pardoned for his past crimes in the US state of South Carolina. Brown had served a two-and-a-half-year prison term after an arrest on drug and assault charges in 1988 was granted a pardon by the State Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services. Brown, who appeared before the board, sang 'God Bless America' after the decision.

2005 - Kylie Minogue: had a cancerous lump removed from her breast at St Frances Xavier Cabrini Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. The singer had been due to begin the 20-date Australian leg of her current worldwide Showgirl tour in Sydney.

2006 - Lordi: Heavy metal monsters Lordi became Finland's first-ever Eurovision Song Contest winners after their song Hard Rock Hallelujah won in Athens. The band won the Eurovision public vote after singing their heavy rock anthem dressed in horror costumes.

2007 - Rihanna: featuring Jay-Z started a 10 week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Umbrella' which spent 10 consecutive weeks at No.1 in the UK making it the longest-running No.1 single since Wet Wet Wet's ‘Love Is All Around'. Rihanna and Jay-Z won a Grammy Award for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration for the track.

2009 - Michael Jackson: delayed the opening four nights of his 'This Is It' UK tour at London's O2 Arena. Concert promoters AEG Live said the delay was necessary because the singer needed more time for dress rehearsals. The first show, on 8 July, was pushed back by five nights. Three other July dates would now not take place until March 2010.

2011 - Pete Doherty: Babyshambles singer Pete Doherty was jailed for six months after being filmed taking crack cocaine by documentary-maker Robyn Whitehead the day before she died of heroin poisoning. A judge told the court that Doherty had an "appalling record" of committing offenses, having made 13 other court appearances. Doherty, 32, had pleaded guilty to possession of cocaine.

2012 - Bee Gees: Robin Gibb, one-third of the Bee Gees and a singer-songwriter who helped to turn disco into a global phenomenon by providing the core of the soundtrack to Saturday Night Fever, died from cancer aged 62. Bee Gees hits including Massachusetts, I've Gotta Get a Message to You, How Deep Is Your Love, and Stayin' Alive, established their pop legacy by placing their falsetto harmonies at the center of the 70s disco boom.

2013 - Ray Manzarek: keyboard player and founder member of The Doors died aged 74. Manzarek, who had suffered from bile duct cancer for many years, died in a clinic in Rosenheim, Germany, with his wife and brothers at his bedside. He formed The Doors with lead singer Jim Morrison in 1965 after a chance meeting in Venice Beach, Los Angeles.

2014 - Prince Rupert Loewenstein: the Bavarian banker credited with turning The Rolling Stones into the world's richest rock band, died at the age of 80. It was on Loewenstein's advice that the Stones became tax exiles, decamping to the South of France in the 1970s. He famously wrote he was "never a fan of the Stones' music".

2015 - The Rolling Stones: played a surprise gig at the 1,300-capacity Fonda Theatre in Los Angeles during which they performed the entire Sticky Fingers album. The audience included Jack Nicholson, Bruce Willis, Harry Styles, Leonard Cohen, and Patricia Arquette.

2016 - Adele: The BPI reported that due to the huge success of artists like Ed Sheeran, Sam Smith, One Direction and Adele British artists accounted for one in every six albums sold worldwide in 2015. Adele was the driving force, selling 17.4 million copies of her third album, 25, in just six weeks.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1940 - Shorty Long: American soul singer Shorty Long. He had the 1968 US No. 8 single 'Here Comes The Judge' and acted as an MC for many of the Motown Revue tours. Long was the only Motown artist besides Smokey Robinson who was allowed to produce his own recordings in the 1960s. He died age 29 on June 29, 1969, after his boat capsized on the Detroit River in Michigan.

1942 - Jill Jackson: from American pop singing duo Paul and Paula, who had the 1963 US No.1 & UK No.8 single, 'Hey Paula'.

1944 - Joe Cocker: English singer and musician who had the 1968 UK No.1 single with his cover of The Beatles 'With A Little Help From My Friends, plus 8 other UK Top 40 singles. Scored the 1982 US No.1 single with Jennifer Warnes 'Up Where We Belong'. In 2007 he was awarded a bronze Sheffield Legends plaque in his hometown and in 2008 he received an OBE at Buckingham Palace for services to music. Cocker died of lung cancer on 22 December 2014 in Crawford, Colorado.

1946 - Cher: Cherilyn Sarkisian, (Cher), American singer and actress, one-half of the folk-rock husband-wife duo Sonny & Cher who had the 1965 UK & US No.1 single 'I Got You, Babe'. She became a television personality in the 1970s with her shows The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, watched by over 30 million viewers weekly during its three-year run. Solo hits include the 1991 UK No.1 single 'The Shoop Shoop Song', 1998 UK No.1 & 1999 US No.1 single 'Believe', plus over 15 other UK Top 40 singles.

1947 - Steve Currie: English bassist Steve Currie from T. Rex scored the 1971 UK No.1 single 'Hot Love', plus over 20 other UK Top 40 singles. Currie died in a car crash in Portugal on 28th April 1981.

1952 - Warren Cann: drummer, with British new wave band Ultravox who had the 1981 UK No.2 single 'Vienna', plus 15 other UK Top 40 singles.

1954 - Jimmy Henderson: from American Southern rock band Black Oak Arkansas, known for their 70s US No.1 radio hit single 'Jim Dandy To The Rescue'.

1955 - Steve George: Keyboardist from American pop rock band Mr. Mister who scored the 1985 US No.1 & 1986 UK No.4 single 'Broken Wings'.

1958 - Jane Wiedlin: guitar, vocals, from all-female American rock band The Go-Go's, who had the 1982 US No.2 single, 'We Got The Beat', and the 1982 UK hit single 'Our Lips Are Sealed. Their 1981 debut album, Beauty and the Beat, is considered one of the "cornerstone albums of US new wave music". Wiedlin had the 1988 solo UK No.12 single 'Rush Hour.

1959 - Iz: or IZ, a Native Hawaiian singer-songwriter, musician. His 1993 medley of ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow - What a Wonderful World’ was featured in several films, television programs, and television commercials. He died on 26 June 1997.

1960 - Sue Cowsill: from American singing group The Cowsills, who had the 1967 US No.2 single 'The Rain, The Park & Other Things, and the 1969 US No.2 single the theme from 'Hair'. TV's Partridge Family was based on The Cowsills family.

1961 - Dan Wilson: American musician, singer, songwriter. He wrote 'Closing Time', for his band, Semisonic, 'Not Ready to Make Nice' (co-written with the Dixie Chicks), and 'Someone like You' (co-written with Adele). He earned a Grammy nomination for 'Closing Time' (Best Rock Song) and won Grammys for Song of the Year ('Not Ready to Make Nice' in 2007) and Album of the Year (which he won in 2012 as one of the producers of Adele’s 21).

1961 - Nick Heyward: guitar, vocals, Haircut 100. The band had four UK Top 10 hit singles between 1981 and 1982, including 'Favourite Shirts (Boy Meets Girl)', 'Love Plus One' and 'Fantastic Day'. Now a solo artist.

1963 - Brian Nash: guitarist with Frankie Goes To Hollywood, the British band who formed in Liverpool and had the 1984 UK No.1 & US No.10 single 'Relax'. The single eventually sold 2 million copies in the UK alone, making it the seventh best-selling single in the UK Singles Chart's history. Their debut album, Welcome to the Pleasuredome, reached No.1 in the UK in 1984 with advanced sales of over one million.

1964 - Patti Russo: American singer/songwriter/actress. Best known as the female lead vocalist with Meat Loaf.

1967 - Kit Clark: from Scottish pop group Danny Wilson who had the 1988 UK No.3 single 'Mary's Prayer'.

1972 - Busta Rhymes: American hip hop artist Busta Rhymes who had the 1998 UK No.2 single 'Turn It Up / Fire It Up', and the 2003 UK No.3 single with Mariah Carey 'I Know What You Want. Rhymes has received 11 Grammy Award nominations for his work.

1981 - Sean Conlon: with English boy band Five who had the 1998 UK No.2 single 'Everybody Get Up' and the 1999 UK No.1 single 'Keep On Movin'.

1981 - Rachel Platten: American singer and songwriter Rachel Platten best known for her 2015 single 'Fight Song' which became a worldwide hit.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Thursday afternoon, (at least for about half the country) the other half, good Thursday morning. Here is what happened on This Day In The History Of Music. Have a great day. 

1957 - Andy Williams: American crooner Andy Williams was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Butterfly', the US singers only UK No.1 and the first of 40 hit singles from 1957 until 2002 on the UK chart.

1960 - The Beatles: The Silver Beetles (John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Stu Sutcliffe, and Tommy Moore) played the first night of a short tour of Scotland backing singer Johnny Gentle, at Alloa Town Hall in Clackmannanshire. Three of the Silver Beetles adopted stage names: Paul McCartney became Paul Ramon, George Harrison was Carl Harrison, and Stuart Sutcliffe became Stuart de Stael.

1964 - Rudy Lewis: of The Drifters died aged 28 under mysterious circumstances the night before the group was set to record 'Under the Boardwalk'. Former Drifters backup singer Johnny Moore was brought back to perform lead vocals for the recording session.

1966 - The Who: Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey of The Who grew tired of waiting for John Entwistle and Keith Moon to arrive for their gig at the Ricky Tick Club in Windsor, England so they took to the stage with the bass player and drummer of the local band that opened the show. When Moon and Entwistle finally arrived in the middle of the set, a fight broke out, with Townshend hitting Moon on the head with his guitar. Moon and Entwistle quit the band, (and rejoined a week later).

1966 - Bob Dylan and The Band: played at the ABC Theatre in Edinburgh, Scotland. Some members of the audience were unhappy with Dylan ‘going electric’, and attempted to overpower the band by playing their own harmonicas.

1967 - Kenny Everett: The Beatles new album Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band had a special preview on the Kenny Everett BBC Light program, 'Where It's At', playing every track from the album, (except 'A Day In The Life' which the BBC had banned saying it could promote drug-taking).

1967 - The Young Rascals: started a two-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Groovin', also a No.8 hit in the UK. The group named themselves after a US comedy TV show. 'Groovin' was also covered by Booker T. & the M.G.'s, Gladys Knight & the Pips, and Marvin Gaye.

1968 - David Bowie: BBC 2 TV aired a short play 'The Pistol Shot', featuring a young dancer - an artist called David Bowie.

1968 - The Beatles: armed with a bunch of new songs after their visit to India, met at George Harrison's home in Esher, Surrey. They taped 23 new songs on George's 4-track recorder, many of which would end up on The Beatles' next two albums, (The White Album) and Abbey Road. The demos include: ‘Cry Baby Cry’, Revolution’, ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’, ‘Blackbird’ and ‘Child of Nature’ (a Lennon song that became ‘Jealous Guy’).

1969 - Led Zeppelin: started three days of recording and mixing sessions at A&R Studios in New York City, which included the recording of 'Heartbreaker' and various other parts for new tracks for the group's forthcoming second album. The band was under pressure to finish sessions for their second album so they could release it in time for the Autumn market.

1970 - The Beatles: Let It Be, the final feature film involving The Beatles was premiered simultaneously in London and Liverpool a week after the film's US release.

1972 - T Rex: were at No.1 on the UK singles chart 'Metal Guru', the group's fourth and final No.1. They also had the UK No.1 album with 'Bolan Boogie.

1978 - Paul McCartney: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'With A Little Luck', his sixth solo US No.1.

1978 - Buddy Holly: The Buddy Holly story film was premiered in Holly's hometown, of Lubbock, Texas. The film features an Oscar-nominated lead performance by Gary Busey.

1989 - Holly Johnson: Ferry 'Cross The Mersey' by Ferry Aid started a three-week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart. The song was recorded to raise funds for the Hillsborough Football victims, Gerry Marsden, Paul McCartney, Holly Johnson, and The Christians all featured on the recording.

1995 - Robson and Jerome: Robson Green and Jerome Flynn started a seven-week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with their versions of 'Unchained Melody' (There'll Be Blue Birds Over) The White Cliffs Of Dover'. Actors Green and Flynn had performed the song in the UK drama series Soldier Soldier.

1995 - Don Henley: from the Eagles married model Sharon Summerall. Guests included Glenn Frey, Joe Walsh, Timothy B. Schmit, David Crosby, Randy Newman, Jimmy Buffett, Jackson Browne, Billy Joel, Sting, and Sheryl Crow.

1997 - Foo Fighters: released their second album 'The Colour And The Shape', the album was a Grammy nominee for Best Rock Album in 1998. Even though Foo Fighters are an American band, the word 'Colour' in the album title is always spelled with the British spelling. This was a nod to producer Gil Norton, who is British.

1997 - U2: caused traffic chaos in Kansas City, Missouri after they paid for traffic control to close down five lanes so they could shoot the video for 'Last Night On Earth. Apart from major traffic jams, a passing Cadillac crashed into a plate glass window trying to avoid a cameraman.

1998 - Frank Sinatra: The funeral of Frank Sinatra was held at the Church of the Good Shepherd in Beverly Hills. Mourners in attendance included Tony Bennett, Faye Dunaway, Tony Curtis, Liza Minnelli, Kirk Douglas, Angie Dickinson, Sophia Loren, Bob Newhart, Mia Farrow, and Jack Nicholson.

1998 - Tommy Lee: from Motley Crue was sentenced to six months jail after being found guilty of spousal abuse.

1998 - Black Sabbath: drummer Bill Ward was taken to hospital in London after suffering a heart attack during a band rehearsal.

2003 - James Brown: Soul singer James Brown was pardoned for his past crimes in the US state of South Carolina. Brown had served a two-and-a-half-year prison term after an arrest on drug and assault charges in 1988 was granted a pardon by the State Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services. Brown, who appeared before the board, sang 'God Bless America' after the decision.

2005 - Kylie Minogue: had a cancerous lump removed from her breast at St Frances Xavier Cabrini Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. The singer had been due to begin the 20-date Australian leg of her current worldwide Showgirl tour in Sydney.

2006 - Lordi: Heavy metal monsters Lordi became Finland's first-ever Eurovision Song Contest winners after their song Hard Rock Hallelujah won in Athens. The band won the Eurovision public vote after singing their heavy rock anthem dressed in horror costumes.

2007 - Rihanna: featuring Jay-Z started a 10 week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Umbrella' which spent 10 consecutive weeks at No.1 in the UK making it the longest-running No.1 single since Wet Wet Wet's ‘Love Is All Around'. Rihanna and Jay-Z won a Grammy Award for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration for the track.

2009 - Michael Jackson: delayed the opening four nights of his 'This Is It' UK tour at London's O2 Arena. Concert promoters AEG Live said the delay was necessary because the singer needed more time for dress rehearsals. The first show, on 8 July, was pushed back by five nights. Three other July dates would now not take place until March 2010.

2011 - Pete Doherty: Babyshambles singer Pete Doherty was jailed for six months after being filmed taking crack cocaine by documentary-maker Robyn Whitehead the day before she died of heroin poisoning. A judge told the court that Doherty had an "appalling record" of committing offenses, having made 13 other court appearances. Doherty, 32, had pleaded guilty to possession of cocaine.

2012 - Bee Gees: Robin Gibb, one-third of the Bee Gees and a singer-songwriter who helped to turn disco into a global phenomenon by providing the core of the soundtrack to Saturday Night Fever, died from cancer aged 62. Bee Gees hits including Massachusetts, I've Gotta Get a Message to You, How Deep Is Your Love, and Stayin' Alive, established their pop legacy by placing their falsetto harmonies at the center of the 70s disco boom.

2013 - Ray Manzarek: keyboard player and founder member of The Doors died aged 74. Manzarek, who had suffered from bile duct cancer for many years, died in a clinic in Rosenheim, Germany, with his wife and brothers at his bedside. He formed The Doors with lead singer Jim Morrison in 1965 after a chance meeting in Venice Beach, Los Angeles.

2014 - Prince Rupert Loewenstein: the Bavarian banker credited with turning The Rolling Stones into the world's richest rock band, died at the age of 80. It was on Loewenstein's advice that the Stones became tax exiles, decamping to the South of France in the 1970s. He famously wrote he was "never a fan of the Stones' music".

2015 - The Rolling Stones: played a surprise gig at the 1,300-capacity Fonda Theatre in Los Angeles during which they performed the entire Sticky Fingers album. The audience included Jack Nicholson, Bruce Willis, Harry Styles, Leonard Cohen, and Patricia Arquette.

2016 - Adele: The BPI reported that due to the huge success of artists like Ed Sheeran, Sam Smith, One Direction and Adele British artists accounted for one in every six albums sold worldwide in 2015. Adele was the driving force, selling 17.4 million copies of her third album, 25, in just six weeks.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1940 - Shorty Long: American soul singer Shorty Long. He had the 1968 US No. 8 single 'Here Comes The Judge' and acted as an MC for many of the Motown Revue tours. Long was the only Motown artist besides Smokey Robinson who was allowed to produce his own recordings in the 1960s. He died age 29 on June 29, 1969, after his boat capsized on the Detroit River in Michigan.

1942 - Jill Jackson: from American pop singing duo Paul and Paula, who had the 1963 US No.1 & UK No.8 single, 'Hey Paula'.

1944 - Joe Cocker: English singer and musician who had the 1968 UK No.1 single with his cover of The Beatles 'With A Little Help From My Friends, plus 8 other UK Top 40 singles. Scored the 1982 US No.1 single with Jennifer Warnes 'Up Where We Belong'. In 2007 he was awarded a bronze Sheffield Legends plaque in his hometown and in 2008 he received an OBE at Buckingham Palace for services to music. Cocker died of lung cancer on 22 December 2014 in Crawford, Colorado.

1946 - Cher: Cherilyn Sarkisian, (Cher), American singer and actress, one-half of the folk-rock husband-wife duo Sonny & Cher who had the 1965 UK & US No.1 single 'I Got You, Babe'. She became a television personality in the 1970s with her shows The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, watched by over 30 million viewers weekly during its three-year run. Solo hits include the 1991 UK No.1 single 'The Shoop Shoop Song', 1998 UK No.1 & 1999 US No.1 single 'Believe', plus over 15 other UK Top 40 singles.

1947 - Steve Currie: English bassist Steve Currie from T. Rex scored the 1971 UK No.1 single 'Hot Love', plus over 20 other UK Top 40 singles. Currie died in a car crash in Portugal on 28th April 1981.

1952 - Warren Cann: drummer, with British new wave band Ultravox who had the 1981 UK No.2 single 'Vienna', plus 15 other UK Top 40 singles.

1954 - Jimmy Henderson: from American Southern rock band Black Oak Arkansas, known for their 70s US No.1 radio hit single 'Jim Dandy To The Rescue'.

1955 - Steve George: Keyboardist from American pop rock band Mr. Mister who scored the 1985 US No.1 & 1986 UK No.4 single 'Broken Wings'.

1958 - Jane Wiedlin: guitar, vocals, from all-female American rock band The Go-Go's, who had the 1982 US No.2 single, 'We Got The Beat', and the 1982 UK hit single 'Our Lips Are Sealed. Their 1981 debut album, Beauty and the Beat, is considered one of the "cornerstone albums of US new wave music". Wiedlin had the 1988 solo UK No.12 single 'Rush Hour.

1959 - Iz: or IZ, a Native Hawaiian singer-songwriter, musician. His 1993 medley of ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow - What a Wonderful World’ was featured in several films, television programs, and television commercials. He died on 26 June 1997.

1960 - Sue Cowsill: from American singing group The Cowsills, who had the 1967 US No.2 single 'The Rain, The Park & Other Things, and the 1969 US No.2 single the theme from 'Hair'. TV's Partridge Family was based on The Cowsills family.

1961 - Dan Wilson: American musician, singer, songwriter. He wrote 'Closing Time', for his band, Semisonic, 'Not Ready to Make Nice' (co-written with the Dixie Chicks), and 'Someone like You' (co-written with Adele). He earned a Grammy nomination for 'Closing Time' (Best Rock Song) and won Grammys for Song of the Year ('Not Ready to Make Nice' in 2007) and Album of the Year (which he won in 2012 as one of the producers of Adele’s 21).

1961 - Nick Heyward: guitar, vocals, Haircut 100. The band had four UK Top 10 hit singles between 1981 and 1982, including 'Favourite Shirts (Boy Meets Girl)', 'Love Plus One' and 'Fantastic Day'. Now a solo artist.

1963 - Brian Nash: guitarist with Frankie Goes To Hollywood, the British band who formed in Liverpool and had the 1984 UK No.1 & US No.10 single 'Relax'. The single eventually sold 2 million copies in the UK alone, making it the seventh best-selling single in the UK Singles Chart's history. Their debut album, Welcome to the Pleasuredome, reached No.1 in the UK in 1984 with advanced sales of over one million.

1964 - Patti Russo: American singer/songwriter/actress. Best known as the female lead vocalist with Meat Loaf.

1967 - Kit Clark: from Scottish pop group Danny Wilson who had the 1988 UK No.3 single 'Mary's Prayer'.

1972 - Busta Rhymes: American hip hop artist Busta Rhymes who had the 1998 UK No.2 single 'Turn It Up / Fire It Up', and the 2003 UK No.3 single with Mariah Carey 'I Know What You Want. Rhymes has received 11 Grammy Award nominations for his work.

1981 - Sean Conlon: with English boy band Five who had the 1998 UK No.2 single 'Everybody Get Up' and the 1999 UK No.1 single 'Keep On Movin'.

1981 - Rachel Platten: American singer and songwriter Rachel Platten best known for her 2015 single 'Fight Song' which became a worldwide hit.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

This Day In The History Of Music for this Friday. I do hope your Friday has been great for you thus far. 

1955 - Chuck Berry: recorded 'Maybellene' at Universal Recording Studios, Chicago, Illinois. The song adapted in part from the Western swing fiddle tune 'Ida Red' is said to be one of the first rock and roll songs. The track became Berry's debut single release in July of this year where it peaked at No.5 on the US chart.

1963 - The Beatles: recorded two BBC radio programs at the Playhouse Theatre in London. They recorded five songs for Saturday Club and six songs for Steppin' Out.

1966 - Bruce Springsteen: The Castiles (with Bruce Springsteen on vocals) appeared at Freehold Regional High School in New Jersey. They were performing at their own high school for the very first time. All five members of the band were Juniors at Freehold High School.

1967 - Jimi Hendrix: signed with Reprise Records on the US Warner Brothers label. They released the guitarist's albums Are You Experienced? Axis: Bold as Love and Electric Ladyland.

1968 - Brian Jones: Rolling Stone Brian Jones appeared at Great Marlborough Street Magistrates Court, London on a charge of possession of marijuana, Jones was released on £200 bail.

1970 - Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young: released the protest single Ohio, written and composed by Neil Young in reaction to the Kent State shootings of May 4, 1970, when unarmed college students were shot by the Ohio National Guard. The guardsmen fired 67 rounds over a period of 13 seconds, killing four students and wounding nine others, one of whom suffered permanent paralysis.

1971 - Marvin Gaye: released his eleventh studio album What's Going On. The concept album consisting of nine songs tells the story from the point of view of a Vietnam veteran returning to the country he had been fighting for and seeing only hatred, suffering, and injustice. What's Going On is regarded as one of the landmark recordings in pop music history, and one of the greatest albums of the 20th century.

1972 - 2nd British Rock Meeting: The Doors, Pink Floyd, the Faces, Family, Curved Air, Atomic Rooster, The Kinks, Rory Gallagher, Uriah Heep, Country Joe McDonald, Buddy Miles, Status Quo, Brinsley Schwarz, Spencer Davis, The Strawbs and Humble Pie all appeared at the 2nd British Rock Meeting, Insel Grun, Germersheim, West Germany. The festival was due to take place in Mannheim, West Germany, but after protests from the locals, the concert actually took place in nearby Germersheim.

1974 - Elton John: Two would-be concert promoters were arrested by police in America on fraud charges in connection with selling mail-order tickets for a forthcoming Elton John show. (Elten with an E and not an O). Police took away over $12,000 in checks.

1977 - Rod Stewart: was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with the double A-sided single 'I Don't Want To Talk About It / First Cut Is The Deepest.' The Danny Whitten song 'I Don't Want To Talk About It' was also a UK No.3 hit for Everything But The Girl in 1988.

1977 - Stevie Wonder: started a three-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with his tribute to Duke Ellington, 'Sir Duke', his sixth US No.1, it made No.2 in the UK.

1979 - Elton John: started a tour of Russia when he played the first of eight concerts making him the first Western star ever to do so.

1980 - Jimi Hendrix: A thief broke into Electric Lady Studios in New York City, the recording studio built by Jimi Hendrix and stole five Hendrix gold records for the albums ‘Are You Experienced’’, ‘Axis: Bold as Love’, ‘Cry of Love’, ‘Rainbow Bridge’ and Live at Monterey.

1980 - Joe Strummer: of The Clash was arrested at a much-troubled gig in Hamburg, Germany, after smashing his guitar over the head of a member of the audience; he was released after an alcohol test proved negative.

1982 - Madonna: The Hacienda Club was opened in Manchester, England. Madonna made her UK TV debut at the club when the C4 music show The Tube was broadcast live. Home to many Manchester acts including Oasis, Happy Mondays, U2, The Smiths, Charlatans, James, M People who all played at the club, (The club closed in 1997).

1983 - David Bowie: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Let's Dance', featuring blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan. It was Bowie's first single to reach number one on both sides of the Atlantic. The music video was made by David Mallet on location in Australia including a bar in Carinda in New South Wales, featured Bowie playing with his band while impassively watching an Aboriginal couple’s struggles against metaphors of Western cultural imperialism.

1988 - Prince: scored his first UK No.1 album with 'Lovesexy.' The cover (based on a photo by Jean Baptiste Mondino) caused some controversy upon release as it depicts Prince in the nude. Some record stores refused to stock it or wrapped the album in black.

1988 - Billy Bragg: Wet Wet Wet and Billy Bragg were at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'With A Little Help From My Friends' and 'She's Leaving Home.' The two Beatles songs had been recorded for the childLine charity, sales of the single, which spent four weeks at No.1 on the UK chart, were over £600,000, all of which was donated to ChildLine.

2001 - Tommy Eyre: Producer, arranger, and keyboardist Tommy Eyre died of cancer aged 51. Worked with George Harrison, Wham! Dusty Springfield, and B.B. King. Played and arranged Joe Cocker's hit 'With A Little Help From My Friends' and Gerry Rafferty's 'Baker Street'.

2003 - Mariah Carey: hit back at Eminem's threats to sample the slushy voicemail messages she left on his mobile. Carey described the rapper as "a little girl" saying it's "like dealing with a girlfriend in 7th grade, and he shouldn't do it because it'll get him in a bit of trouble with her lawyers."

2005 - Brian Harvey: Former East 17 singer Brian Harvey was rushed to hospital following his second suicide bid in a month. The singer battled with police outside his house after taking an overdose of sleeping pills.

2007 - Scott Stapp: Former singer with Creed, Scott Stapp was arrested at his Florida home and charged with assault. The 33-year-old was held without bail following the charges, which related to a domestic assault.

2008 - Lou Pearlman: the music mogul who created the Backstreet Boys and 'N Sync, was sentenced to 25 years in federal prison over a decades-long scam that swindled thousands of investors out of their life savings. Many victims were Pearlman's relatives, friends, and retirees in their 70s or 80s who lost everything.

2010 - U2: lead singer Bono had emergency spinal surgery after suffering an injury while preparing for tour dates. The 50-year-old singer was treated at a specialist neurosurgery clinic in Munich and was expected to stay there for a number of days.

2011 - Adele: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Rolling In The Deep', taken from her second studio album, 21. The video to the song was nominated for seven MTV Video Music Awards nominations, 'Rolling in the Deep' was also the Billboard Year-End Hot 100 Number One Single of 2011. And on 12 February 2012, 'Rolling in the Deep' received three Grammy Awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Short Form Music Video.

2011 - Bob Dylan: came out on top as both the most inspirational individual for poets and the dream collaborative partner, in a survey carried out by The Foyle Poetry Society. The extensive survey questioned poets asking which musician and which genre of music most inspired their writing. The young people, aged between 11 and 17, from countries throughout the world also voted for artists such as Regina Spektor, David Bowie, Florence, and the Machine, Leonard Cohen, Morrissey, and Pete Doherty.

2013 - Trevor Bolder: the bassist in David Bowie's legendary 1970s backing band Spiders From Mars, died from cancer at the age of 62. Bolder appeared on the studio albums Hunky Dory (1971), The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1972), Aladdin Sane (1973), and Pin Ups (1973). He joined Uriah Heep in 1976, replacing John Wetton.

2013 - Chris Brown: was charged with a misdemeanor hit-and-run and driving without a valid license following an accident in the San Fernando Valley, California. If convicted, the singer could face up to one year in jail with other recent incidents including an outburst at a valet, a parking lot brawl with Frank Ocean, and a fight with Drake in a New York nightclub.

2015 - Louis Johnson: American bass guitarist Louis Johnson died aged 60. He was a member of Brothers Johnson, (1980 US No.4 & UK No.6 single 'Stomp'). Johnson played on the Michael Jackson albums Off the Wall, Thriller and Dangerous, and hit songs 'Billie Jean' and 'Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough.

2015 - Black Sabbath: received a lifetime achievement prize at the Ivor Novello songwriting awards. Guitarist Tony Iommi picked up the trophy, confirming the heavy metal band would embark on their "final tour" next year. Ed Sheeran was named songwriter of the year, and Annie Lennox was awarded the fellowship of the British Society of Songwriters, Composers, and Authors (Basca) - the society's highest honor.

2016 - Nick Menza: a former drummer in heavy metal band Megadeth, died after suffering a "massive heart attack" on stage while performing with his band, OHM, in Los Angeles.

2019 - Jake Black: Scottish musician Jake Black (The Very Reverend D. Wayne Love), died at age 59. He was a member of Alabama 3 who are best known for their track ‘Woke Up This Morning’ which was used for the opening credits of the TV series The Sopranos. In the United States, the band is known as A3, to avoid legal conflict with the country music band Alabama.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1904 - Fats Waller: American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer. His best-known compositions, 'Ain't Misbehavin'' and 'Honeysuckle Rose', were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1984 and 1999. In 1926 Waller was kidnapped at gunpoint in Chicago and driven to a club owned by gangster Al Capone. Inside the club, he was ordered to perform at what turned out to be a surprise birthday party for the gangster. Waller died on 15 December 1943.

1934 - Sonny Forriest: American guitarist Sonny Forriest was a member of The Coasters. The American rhythm and blues/rock and roll vocal group scored the 1958 US No.1 single 'Yakety Yak', the 1959 US No.2 and UK No.6 single 'Charlie Brown', as well as 'Young Blood' and 'Poison Ivy'. Forriest died on Jan 10th, 1999.

1940 - Tony Sheridan: English rock and roll singer-songwriter and guitarist Tony Sheridan. He was best known as an early collaborator of The Beatles and the only non-Beatle to appear as lead singer on a Beatles recording ('My Bonnie') which charted as a single. Sheridan died on 16 February 2013.

1941 - Ronald Isley: from American group The Isley Brothers who first came to prominence in 1959 with their fourth single, 'Shout', and then the 1962 hit 'Twist and Shout. The Isley Brothers also scored the hits 'This Old Heart Of Mine', 'Summer Breeze' and 'Harvest for the World'. Sixteen of their albums charted in the Top 40.

1943 - Hilton Valentine: English musician, who was the original guitarist in The Animals who had the 1964 UK & US No.1 single 'House Of The Rising Sun'.

1943 - John Dalton: bass guitar player, best known as a member of The Kinks from 1966 & 1969 to 1976 and played on the 1967 UK No.2 single 'Waterloo Sunset'.

1943 - Vincent Crane: English keyboardist who was best known as the organist for The Crazy World of Arthur Brown and Atomic Rooster. The Crazy World of Arthur Brown scored the 1968 UK No.1 and US No.12 single 'Fire', and Atomic Rooster, the 1971 UK No.4 single 'The Devil's Answer'. He died on 14th February 1989 from a deliberate overdose of Anadin tablets at age 45.

1947 - Bill Champlin: American singer, guitarist, keyboard player, and songwriter Bill Champlin who joined Chicago in 1981. He sang (with Peter Cetera) on the band's 1984 hit single 'Hard Habit to Break'.

1948 - Leo Sayer: British-born singer-songwriter Leo Sayer who had the 1977 UK & US No.1 single 'When I Need You', the Chrysalis record label their first UK No.1. Sayer also co-wrote 'Giving It All Away, which gave Roger Daltrey of The Who his first solo hit in 1973.

1955 - Stan Lynch:  American musician, songwriter, and record producer who was the original drummer for Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, (1977 single 'American Girl', 1989 UK No.28 single 'I Won't Back Down, 1991 UK No.3 album 'Into The Great Wide Open). He partnered with longtime friend Don Henley to help put together Eagles' reunion album Hell Freezes Over and as a producer and writer, Lynch has worked with a diverse array of acts, such as The Band, Eagles, Don Henley, Jackopierce, Joe 90, Scotty Moore, The Fabulous Thunderbirds, The Jeff Healey Band, Tim McGraw, and Ringo Starr.

1963 - Tim Lever: from English pop band, Dead Or Alive, who scored the 1985 UK No.1 single 'You Spin Me Round, Like A Record'.

1964 - Martin Blunt: bassist with English indie rock band The Charlatans who had the 1990 UK No.9 single 'The Only One I Know'. In the UK, all of the band's thirteen studio albums have charted in the Top 40 of the UK Albums Chart, three of them being No.1s.

1972 - Notorious B.I.G.: American rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (aka Biggie Smalls, aka Christopher G. Wallace). He scored the 1997 US No.1 single 'Hypnotize'. He was gunned down on the streets of Los Angeles on 9th March 1997 aged 24. Three more albums have been released since his death and he has sold over 17 million records in the United States.

1975 - Lee Gaze: guitarist, from Welsh rock band Lostprophets, who scored the 2006 UK No.1 album Liberation Transmission.

1978 - Adam Wade Gontier: lead singer and guitarist from Canadian rock band Three Days Grace. The band has a string of No.1 songs on the Billboard Alternative Songs Chart.

1980 - Gotye: Belgian-born, Australian multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter Wouter De Backer, known professionally as Gotye. His 2012 single ‘Somebody That I Used to Know’ topped charts in the US, UK, Australia, as well as 23 other national charts.

1985 - Mutya Buena: a singer with British girl group Sugababes who had the 2002 UK No.1 single, 'Round Round'. In 2006, British Hit Singles & Albums named the Sugababes as the most successful female act of the 21st century with six UK No.1 singles and eighteen UK top ten hits.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

This Day In The History Of Music for this Saturday. I do hope your Saturday has been kind to you. 

 

1958 - Jerry Lee Lewis: arrived at London's Heathrow Airport to begin his first British tour, along with his new bride, 14-year-old third cousin, Myra. Although advised not to mention it, Lewis answered all questions about his private life. The public's shock over Lewis' marriage marks the start of a controversy leading to his British tour being canceled after just 3 of the scheduled 37 performances.

1961 - Ernie K Doe: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Mother In Law'. The song was written and produced by Allen Toussaint who also played the piano solo. Huey Lewis and the News recorded the song for the 1994 covers album, Four Chords & Several Years Ago.  

1965 - The Beatles: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Ticket To Ride', the group's eighth US No.1. The American single's label declared that the song was from the United Artists release Eight Arms to Hold You. This was the original title of the Beatles' second movie; the title changed to Help! after the single was initially released. 

1968 - Gary Puckett: and the Union Gap were at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Young Girl.' The song which was about underage sex was the acts only UK No.1.  

1971 - The Rolling Stones: album Sticky Fingers started a four-week run at No.1 on the US charts, the group's second US No.1 album. The artwork for Sticky Fingers which, on the original vinyl release, featured a working zipper that opened to reveal cotton briefs, was conceived by American pop artist Andy Warhol. The cover, a photo of Joe Dallesandro's crotch clad in tight blue jeans, was assumed by many fans to be an image of Mick Jagger. The album also features the first usage of the "Tongue and Lip Design" designed by John Pasche.  

1976 - Paul McCartney: Wings started a five-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Silly Love Songs', McCartney's fifth US No.1 since leaving The Beatles. Paul McCartney had often been teased by music critics as well as former Beatle and friend, John Lennon, for writing lightweight songs and he wrote this number in response.  

1980 - U2: kicked off their 23 dates '11 O'Clock Tick Tock' tour at The Hope & Anchor in London.  

1989 - Public Enemy: Rap group Public Enemy fired one of its members, Professor Griff after he made anti-Semitic remarks in the Washington Post.  

1991 - Wil Sinnott: from The Shamen drowned while swimming off the coast of La Gomera when he was pulled under by strong currents. The Shamen were in Tenerife filming a video for their new single 'Move Any Mountain.'  

1993 - Ace Of Base: Swedish group Ace Of Base started a three-week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'All That She Wants', a No.2 hit in the US.  

2000 - Robbie Williams: set up a children's charity with the cash he earned from a deal with Pepsi. The trust, 'Give It Sum', boasted £2m seed money. Beneficiaries would include UNICEF and Jeans For Genes.  

2000 - Ivor Novello: Travis swept the board at the Ivor Novello awards. Singer Fran Healy won two awards for Best Contemporary Song for the single 'Why Does It Always Rain On Me'' And Songwriter Of The Year for the Travis album 'The Man Who.'  

2002 - Adam Ant: appeared at The Old Bailey in London charged with possession of an imitation firearm. Ant, (Stuart Goddard) had been arrested in January after an altercation at The Prince of Wales pub in London when a bouncer refused to let him in.  

2004 - Morrissey: appeared at the M.E.N. arena Manchester, England on his 45th birthday. It was Morrissey's return to his home city Manchester after an absence of 12 years and the 18000 tickets sold out in only 90 minutes. During the set, Morrissey performed five Smiths songs.  

2005 - Dave Matthews Band: Band was at No.1 on the US album chart with 'Stand Up.' The album entered the chart at No.1 with sales of 465,000. Features the singles 'American Baby,' 'Dreamgirl,' and 'Everybody Wake Up.'  

2009 - White Stripes: drummer Meg White married Jackson Smith at ex-husband and bandmate Jack White's Nashville home. Jack and Meg White were married for four years and divorced in 2000. The event was part of a double wedding, which also saw Jack Lawrence and Jo McCaughey marry. Lawrence plays bass in Jack White's other musical projects, The Raconteurs and The Dead Weather.  

2010 - Alanis Morrisette: married rapper Mario “Souleye” Treadway in a private ceremony at their Los Angeles home.  

2011 - Kiss: Four dead dogs in 'sealed containers' were found in the Tennessee home of former Kiss guitarist Vinnie Vincent during an investigation that led to his arrest on charges of assaulting his wife. Vincent, a member of Kiss from 1982 to 1984, was released after posting a $10,000 bond after his arrest by the Rutherford County Sheriff's Department.  

2012 - Mick Jagger: British newspaper The Sun, reported that Mick Jagger's lavish Caribbean holiday home on Mustique was available for hire, at £9,500 a week, but added that Mick, demanded full details of applicants’ backgrounds, including professions, before they were even considered. Bandmate Keith Richards' beach-front Caribbean holiday home at Parrot Cay Resort in the Turks and Caicos Islands was also available for rent, at £35,000 a week.  

2014 - Fleetwood Mac: Christine McVie was honored with a lifetime achievement at this year's Ivor Novello songwriting awards. McVie played with Fleetwood Mac for 28 years and wrote some of their most famous songs, including 'Don't Stop' and 'Little Lies'. Other winners at the ceremony in London included London Grammar, The Chemical Brothers, and Nile Rodgers.  

2016 - Elvis Presley: A guitar that Elvis Presley was given by his father sold for $334,000 (£230,000) at an auction in New York. It was thought that Vernon Presley changed the finish on the Gibson Dove to black after his son earned a black belt in karate. Presley later gave the guitar to a fan during a concert in North Carolina in 1975. Auctioneers Julien's also sold John Lennon's handwritten lyrics for The Beatles' 'Being For The Benefit of Mr. Kite!' for $354,400 (£244,000) and a red neoprene vinyl jacket which Michael Jackson wore for his 1996-97 HIStory world tour which sold for $256,000.  

2017 - Drake: broke Adele's record for the most wins at the Billboard Music Awards after the Canadian rapper picked up 13 prizes, beating Adele by one. The event which was held in Las Vegas also saw Twenty One Pilots pick up top duo/group and top rock artist with Metallica winning in the rock album category.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1924 - Charles Aznavour: French singer, actor, public activist, and diplomat, famous for his 1974 UK No.1 single 'She'. He was one of France's most popular and enduring singers and was dubbed France's Frank Sinatra, selling more than 180 million records, recording more than 1,200 songs (interpreted in nine languages) and he wrote or co-wrote more than 1,000 songs for himself and others. On 1 October 2018, Aznavour was found dead in a bathtub at his home at Mouriès at the age of 94.

1931 - Kenny Ball: English jazz musician, best known as the bandleader, lead trumpet player, and vocalist in Kenny Ball and his Jazzmen who had the 1961 UK & US No.2 single 'Midnight In Moscow'. Ball died on 7 March 2013 at Basildon Hospital, Essex, where he was being treated for pneumonia.

1941 - Jackie Landry Jackson: singer, from African-American girl group The Chantels, who had the 1958 top 20 hits 'Maybe' and the 1961 hit 'Look In My Eyes'. She died on December 23, 1997.

1941 - Bruce Rowlands: drummer, best known for his memberships of The Grease Band (he played for Joe Cocker's performance at the Woodstock Festival) and folk-rock band Fairport Convention as well as Ronnie Lane's Slim Chance. He was also a prolific session musician. He died on 29 June 2015.

1942 - Calvin Simon: a former member of the bands' Parliament and Funkadelic who had the 1978 US No.16 album 'One Nation Under A Groove'.

1947 - Bill Lordan: American drummer Bill Lordan who worked with Sly & The Family Stone, Bobby Womack, Ike, and Tina Turner, and the Robin Trower Band.

1950 - Bernie Taupin: English lyricist, poet, and singer and Elton John's long-time songwriting partner. Rod Stewart, Cher, The Motels, John Waite, Starship, and Alice Cooper have all recorded his songs. In 1967, Taupin answered an advertisement placed in the UK music paper New Musical Express by Liberty Records, a company that was seeking new songwriters, Elton John responded to the advertisement, and the pair were brought together.

1954 - Jerry Dammers: founder member and keyboard play with The Specials who had the 1981 UK No.1 single 'Ghost Town'. He contributed to the founding of the Coventry-based 2 Tone Records.

1955 - Iva Davis: singer-songwriter, a musician from Australian rock band Icehouse who had the 1983 UK hit single 'Hey Little Girl. Their best-known singles on the Australian charts were 'Great Southern Land', 'Crazy' and 'Electric Blue'.

1955 - Mary Black: Irish singer, songwriter, who has released over 12 solo albums. For a number of years, What Hi-Fi? the magazine considered Black's voice to be so pure, that it was used as an audiophile benchmark for comparing the sound quality of different high-fidelity systems.

1959 - Morrissey: English singer, songwriter Steven Morrissey from The Smiths, who scored the 1984 UK No.10 single 'Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now', plus over 15 other UK Top 40 singles. As a solo artist, he scored the 1988 UK No.5 single 'Suedehead' plus over 15 other UK Top 40 singles. Widely regarded as an important innovator in the indie music scene, he has also attracted media attention for his advocacy of vegetarianism and animal rights.

1962 - Jesse Valenzuela: from American rock band Gin Blossoms, who had the 1994 UK top 30 hit single 'Hey Jealousy', from their first major-label album, New Miserable Experience (1992).

1966 - Johnny Gill: American singer-songwriter and actor Johnny Gill who had the 1992 UK No.17 single, 'Slow And Sexy'. Gill was the sixth and final member of the R&B pop group New Edition and was also a member of the supergroup called LSG, with Gerald Levert and Keith Sweat.

1967 - Dan Roberts: bassist with Canadian rock band Crash Test Dummies best known internationally for their 1993 single 'Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm'.

1979 - Russell Pritchard: bassist with English indie rock band The Zutons. Their 2006 UK No.9 single ‘Valerie’ was later covered by Mark Ronson (with the lead vocals provided by Amy Winehouse.

1981 - Mis-Teeq: Su-Elise Nash, from British girl group Mis-Teeq who had the 2001 UK No.2 single 'All I Want' and seven consecutive top-ten singles.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Sunday morning to you. I hope your weekend has been good thus far. Before I get into doing the post, I just want to give a birthday wish to my favorite music artist. Happy Birthday, Jewel Kilcher. Her family is on the Discovery Channel series called "Alaska The Last Frontier" in case some of you readers did not know that. Her family originates from  Switzerland, her grandfather Yule Kilcher came here in 1936 before the start of World War II, he knew Hitler was up to no good, so this was the beginning of the Kilcher story. Yule Kilcher also helped in the politics of forming Alaska as a state. You can learn more about Jewel and the rest of the Kilchers on Discovery.com, they have bios for each Kilcher member (minus the sisters of Otto and Atz Sr.). 

1960 - The Everly Brothers: started a five-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Cathy's Clown', which also spent seven weeks at No.1 in the UK. It became the Everly Brothers' biggest hit single and their third and final US chart-topper, selling eight million copies worldwide.

1964 - Ella Fitzgerald: became the first artist to have a hit with a Beatles cover when her version of 'Can't Buy Me Love' entered the UK chart.

1970 - Paul McCartney: debut solo album, McCartney, started a three-week run at No.1 on the US album chart. Apart from Linda McCartney's vocal contributions, McCartney performed and recorded the entire album solo. The album featured 'Maybe I'm Amazed', which Rod Stewart and the Faces featured on their 1971 album Long Player.

1970 - The Beatles: 12th and final studio album 'Let It Be' started a three-week run at No.1 on the UK chart, featuring 'The Long And Winding Road', 'Across The Universe' and the title track.

1970 - The Grateful Dead: played their first gig outside the US at 'The Hollywood Rock Music Festival', in Newcastle under Lyme, Staffs, England. Also appearing at the festival was Free, Ginger Baker's Air Force, Colosseum, Family, Black Sabbath, and Traffic.

1973 - Jefferson Airplane: were prevented from giving a free concert in Golden Gate Park when San Francisco authorities passed a resolution banning electronic instruments. The group later wrote 'We Built this City' about the ban.

1974 - George Harrison: announced the launch of his own record label, 'Dark Horse.' 1978 - Bruce Springsteen: and the E Street Band kicked off their 117 show Darkness Tour at Shea's Buffalo, in Buffalo, New York.

1979 - Tom Petty: Due to a record company dispute, Tom Petty was forced to file for bankruptcy owing $575,000 (£338,235). A long-running battle with his record company followed.

1982 - The UK Musicians Union: moved a resolution to ban synthesizers and drum rhythm machines from sessions and live concerts fearing that their use would put musicians out of work.

1987 - Doobie Brothers: Twelve former members of the Doobie Brothers reunited for a charity concert at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles. The show raised $350,000 for Vietnam veterans, about two thousand of whom attended the show for free.

1991 - Nirvana: Photographer Michael Lavine took what would be the publicity shots for Nirvana's Nevermind album at Jay Aaron Studios in Los Angeles. The idea for the front cover shot of the baby swimming was taken after Kurt Cobain and Dave Grohl saw a TV documentary on water babies and was taken by Kirk Weddle. Several babies were used; five-month-old Spencer Eldon's photo came out best.

1992 - Freddie Mercury: A statement issued by Freddie Mercury's attorneys stated that Mercury had bequeathed the majority of his estate (£10 million - $17 million) to his long-time friend Mary Austin.

2000 - Noel Gallagher: walked out on his band Oasis during a European tour. The move was put down to a series of burst-ups with his brother Liam. The band drafted in replacement guitarist Matt Deighton for the rest of the European dates.

2000 - Eminem: released his third studio album The Marshall Mathers LP. It debuted at No.1 on the Billboard 200, staying atop for eight consecutive weeks, and went on to sell over 25 million copies worldwide. The album is one of the most groundbreaking and controversial albums in the history of American music. The Marshall Mathers LP has been named on several lists of the greatest albums of all time and is widely regarded as Eminem's best album.

2002 - Madonna: 'Up For Grabs' opened at London's Wyndham's Theatre featuring Madonna in the lead role. The first-night crowd complained that the singer was lacking in vocal power and strained to hear her lines.

2002 - Dido: Winners at the 47th Ivor Novello awards included, Dido for Songwriter of the year, the Best song went to U2, 'Walk On.' Kylie Minogue won The Dance Award and Most Performed Work and International Hit for 'Can't Get You Out Of My Head.' Hearsay won Bestselling UK single for 'Pure And Simple. Mick Hucknall won the Outstanding Song collection and Kate Bush was awarded Outstanding Contribution to British music.

2006 - Led Zeppelin: The King of Sweden presented the surviving members of Led Zeppelin with the Polar Music Prize in Stockholm recognizing them as "great pioneers" of rock music. Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, and John Paul Jones were joined by the daughter of drummer John Bonham, who died in 1980. The Polar Music Prize was founded in 1989 by Stig Anderson, manager of Swedish pop group ABBA who named it after his record label, Polar Records.

2009 - Amy Winehouse: canceled her appearance at a concert to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Island Records. The event, scheduled to take place on 31st May at London's Shepherd's Bush Empire, had now been canceled completely, her management said.

2010 - The Rolling Stones: scored their first UK No.1 album for 16 years with the re-release of their classic 1972 double LP Exile On Main Street. The album, which was first released in 1972, had been reissued with previously unheard tracks. Their last No.1 album was 1994's Voodoo Lounge.

2012 - Music Survey: Erasmus MC University Medical Center in the Netherlands announced they had drawn clear links between listening to loud music, smoking marijuana, and having "risky" sex. The study, published in the Official Journal of the American Academy Of Pediatrics, revealed that young people who listened to loud music on their MP3 players were more likely to have sparked up a joint in the last month. The researchers surveyed 944 students from inner-city vocational schools aged 15 to 25.

2014 - Gregg Allman: The parents of a camera assistant who was killed after being hit by a train while shooting footage for a biopic about Gregg Allman were suing the musician and the film's producers. The case claimed filmmakers "selected an unreasonably dangerous site for the filming location" and failed to take actions to adequately protect the crew.

2019 - Richard Ashcroft: regained rights to his song ‘Bitter Sweet Symphony’ after more than two decades. The Verve singer lost the rights to his most recognizable song, which ended up in the possession of The Rolling Stones’ Sir Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Released in 1997 on Urban Hymns, the track sampled The Rolling Stones’ song ‘The Last Time’, using a composition by Andrew Oldham, and became the center of lawsuits, which saw Ashcroft stripped of rights and royalties.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1928 - Rosemary Clooney: American singer who came to prominence in the early 1950s with the novelty hit 'Come On-a My House', which was followed by other pop numbers such as 'Botch-a-Me', 'Mambo Italiano' and 'This Ole House. She died on 29th June 2002.

1934 - Robert Moog: inventor of the synthesizer. He built his first electronic instrument, a theremin - aged 14 and made the MiniMoog, "the first compact, easy-to-use synthesizer" in 1970. He died on 21st Aug 2005 at his North Carolina home aged 71, four months after being diagnosed with brain cancer.

1943 - Norman Johnson: (General Johnson), Chairmen Of The Board who had the 1970 UK & US No.3 single, 'Give Me Just A Little More Time'). He also wrote the Grammy Award-winning 'Patches' for Clarence Carter (Jerry Reed also recorded a country music cover version). Johnson died on October 13, 2010, in suburban Atlanta, Georgia.

1944 - Raymond Fulwood: American musician Tiki Fulwood was the drummer for the funk bands Parliament and Funkadelic. Fulwood died of stomach cancer on 29 October 1979.

1946 - Daniel Klein: bassist with American rock band The J Geils Band, who had the 1982 US No.1 & UK No.3 single 'Centerfold' which was taken from their US No.1 1981 album Freeze Frame.

1953 - Rick Fenn: English rock guitarist Rick Fenn, best known for being a member of 10cc since 1976. He has also collaborated with Mike Oldfield, Rick Wakeman, and Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason.

1965 - Simon Gilbert: drummer from English alternative rock band Suede, who had the 1994 UK No.3 single 'Stay Together. Following Suede's hiatus in 2003, he was the drummer for a local Bangkok band called Futon.

1967 - Junior Waite: English drummer Junior Waite, Musical Youth, best remembered for their successful 1982 single 'Pass the Dutchie', which became a No.1 hit around the world. It was a cover version of two songs: 'Gimme the Music' by U Brown, and 'Pass the Kouchie' by Mighty Diamonds, which deals with the recreational use of cannabis (Kouchie being slang for a cannabis pipe).

1967 - Philip James Selway: drummer with Radiohead. Their 1993 debut single 'Creep' was initially unsuccessful, but it became a worldwide hit several months after the release of their debut album, Pablo Honey. Their 1997 album OK Computer appeared in many 1997 critics' lists and listener polls for best album of the year.

1970 - Matt Flynn: the drummer of American rock band Maroon 5. Prior to joining Maroon 5, Flynn played drums for The B-52's, Chicago, Gavin DeGraw, and Gandhi.

1972 - Maxwell: American singer, songwriter, record producer Maxwell, who scored the 2001 US No.1 album, Now. Maxwell has been credited with helping to shape what has been termed the "neo-soul" movement that rose to prominence during the late 1990s.

1974 - Jewel Kilcher: is an American singer-songwriter, musician, actress, and author. She has received four Grammy Award nominations and, as of 2015, has sold over 30 million albums worldwide. Jewel was raised near Homer, Alaska, where she grew up singing and yodeling as a duo with her father, a local musician. At age fifteen, she received a partial scholarship at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan, where she studied operatic voice. After graduating, she began writing and performing at clubs and coffeehouses in San Diego, California. Based on local media attention, she was offered a recording contract with Atlantic Records, which released her debut album, Pieces of You, in 1995; it went on to become one of the best-selling debut albums of all time, going 12-times platinum. The debut single from the album, "Who Will Save Your Soul", peaked at number 11 on the Billboard Hot 100; two others, "You Were Meant for Me" and "Foolish Games", reached number two on the Hot 100, and were listed on Billboard's 1997 year-end singles chart, as well as Billboard's 1998 year-end singles chart.  

1974 - Richard Jones: bassist from Welsh rock band, Stereophonics, who had the 2001 UK No.5 single 'Have A Nice Day. Their 1999 UK No.1 album, Performance, and Cocktails spent 97 weeks on the UK chart.

1983 - Heidi Range: a singer who was an original member of Atomic Kitten and then joined The Sugababes who had the 2003 UK No.1 single 'Hole In The Head'. 1985 - Blaine Harrison: English musician and songwriter best known as the lead vocalist of the indie rock band Mystery Jets.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

I do apologize for such a late post. Here is what happened on "This Day In The History Of Music" for this Monday.

 

1956 - Lys Assia: The first Eurovision Song Contest was held in Lugano, Switzerland. The event was the brainchild of Marcel Baisoncon of the European Broadcasting Union. Seven countries participated and they were each allowed two songs. Both Luxembourg and the winner Switzerland used the same singer for both. Switzerland won with 'Refrain' by Lys Assia.

1962 - Elvis Presley: was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Good Luck Charm' his 11th UK No.1 single. It completed his second hat-trick of chart-topping singles in the UK.

1963 - The Beatles: recorded the first of their very own BBC radio program, "Pop Go the Beatles". The theme song for the program was a version of "Pop Goes the Weasel". The Beatles' guests for this first show were the Lorne Gibson Trio.

1963 - Elmore James: US blues guitarist and singer Elmore James died of a heart attack aged 45. James wrote 'Shake Your Money Maker', which was covered by Fleetwood Mac in 1968. Known as "The King of the Slide Guitar", James influenced Jimi Hendrix, B.B. King, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Keith Richards.

1966 - Captain Beefheart: appeared at the Whisky a Go-Go. West Hollywood, California. Supported by Buffalo Springfield and The Doors.

1968 - The Rolling Stones: released the single 'Jumpin Jack Flash' in the UK, the track gave them their seventh UK No.1 hit. Keith Richards has stated that he and Jagger wrote the lyrics while staying at Richards' country house, where they were awoken one morning by the sound of gardener Jack Dyer walking past the window. When Jagger asked what the noise was, Richards responded: "Oh, that's Jack – that's jumpin' Jack."

1969 - Bob Dylan: album Nashville Skyline peaked at No.3 in the US chart. The singer's ninth album also scored Dylan his fourth UK No.1. The album featured 'Lay Lady Lay', which became one of Dylan's biggest pop hits, reaching No.7 in the US, his biggest single in three years.

1969 - Billy Preston: The Beatles with Billy Preston started a five-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Get Back, the group's 17th US No.1. Credited to "The Beatles with Billy Preston", it was the Beatles' only single that credited another artist, 'Get Back' was also the Beatles' first single release in true stereo in the US.

1970 - Peter Green: Guitarist and founding member Peter Green played his last gig with Fleetwood Mac when they appeared at the Bath Festival, Somerset, England.

1974 - David Bowie: released his eighth studio album Diamond Dogs. The cover art features Bowie as a striking half-man, half-dog grotesque painted by Belgian artist Guy Peellaert. It was controversial as the full painting clearly showed the hybrid's genitalia.

1975 - Earth Wind and Fire: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Shining Star', the group's first and only US No.1.

1980 - Phil Collins: Genesis fans turning up at the Roxy Club box office in Los Angeles to buy tickets for a forthcoming gig were surprised to find the band members Phil Collins, Tony Banks, and Mike Rutherford selling the tickets themselves.

1991 - Gene Clark: Founder member of The Byrds Gene Clark died of a heart attack aged 49. Wrote The Byrds hits 'I'll Feel a Whole Lot Better, and 'Eight Miles High', member of McGuinn, Clark, and Hillman and solo.

1997 - Hanson: started a three-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'MMMBop', the brothers first US No.1, also a No.1 in the UK. 'MMMBop' was phenomenally successful, especially for a debut single, reaching No.1 in 27 countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, and Mexico.

1997 - The Spice Girls: went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Spice', making them only the third all-girl group to do so after The Supremes and The Go-Gos and the first ever UK girl group to do so.

1999 - Queen: singer Freddie Mercury, who died in 1991, was honored on a new set of millennium stamps issued by the Royal Mail. Mercury, who featured on the 19p stamp, was a keen stamp collector, and his collection was bought by the Post Office in 1993. The stamp marked his contribution to the Live Aid charity concert in 1985, and caused controversy by featuring a small portion of Queen’s drummer, Roger Taylor, in the background - UK stamps by tradition only carry pictures of living persons who are members of the Royal Family.

2000 - Chrissie Hynde: A New York Judge told Pretenders singer Chrissie Hynde that if she wanted her March arrest for protesting the sale of leather goods in a Gap store dismissed, she'd better keep her nose clean for the next six months.

2000 - Andrea Corr: and Sharon Corr from The Corrs both collapsed in the mid-day sun whilst shooting their new video in the Mojave Desert in California. The pair were treated in hospital for heat exhaustion and were back on the set within 24 hours.

2003 - Paul McCartney: made his first-ever live performance in Russia when he appeared in front of 20,000 fans in Red Square.

2004 - Madonna: kicked off the North American leg of her Re-invention World Tour by playing three sold-out nights in Los Angeles The tour became the top-grossing of the year, with ticket sales of nearly $125 million, with over 900,000 fans attending the 60 date tour. As a follower of the Kabbalah, Madonna didn't play any Friday night gigs as the teaching of the religion forbids it.

2007 - Amy Winehouse: Madonna and Arctic Monkeys were among the winners at this year's Ivor Novello Awards. Winehouse won best contemporary song for her hit ‘Rehab’, while Madonna collected the international hit of the year for ‘Sorry.’ Sheffield-based band Arctic Monkeys collected the best album award for ‘Whatever People Say I Am That's What I'm Not.’

2009 - Billy Joel: was being sued by his former drummer for hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid royalties. Liberty Devitto claimed that Joel hadn't paid him proper royalties for 10 years of his work. Devitto was Joel's drummer from 1975 until 2005 when he said he was abruptly thrown out of the band. He said: "People get fired, they get severance or insurance for a certain period of time. I didn't even get a phone call. It was cold."

2010 - Slipknot: Paul Gray, the bassist with US metal band Slipknot, was found dead in a hotel in Des Moines, Iowa. The body of the 38-year-old musician was found by an employee at the hotel in a suburb of the city. Police said foul play was not suspected, but an autopsy would be carried out. The nine members of Slipknot wore masks in public and referred to other bandmates by numbers; Gray was number two.

2017 - Elvis Presley: Sonny West, one of the original members of Elvis Presley's Memphis Mafia, died of lung cancer at the age of 79. Joining Elvis in 1960, he was abruptly fired, along with his cousin Red and bodyguard Dave Hebler, in 1976 without explanation. The following year he co-authored the book Elvis, What Happened?.

2020 - Al Rex: American bassist Al Rex died age 91. He started playing for Bill Haley & His Comets and its predecessor Bill Haley and the Saddlemen in 1949 and became noted for 'wild antics on stage.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1938 - Prince Buster: Jamaican singer, songwriter, and producer, Prince Buster. The records he released in the 1960s influenced and shaped the course of Jamaican contemporary music and created a legacy of work that later reggae and ska artists would draw upon. Buster died on 8 September 2016, in a hospital in Miami, Florida, after suffering heart problems.

1941 - Bob Dylan: (Robert Zimmerman), American singer-songwriter, author, and painter. Dylan has released over 40 albums since 1964 and was a major influence on The Beatles. His biggest hits are the 1965 US No.2 single 'Like A Rolling Stone', the 1969 UK No.5 single 'Lay Lady Lay, and his 1964 UK No.1 album The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan. He has won many awards throughout his career including the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature, and twelve Grammy Awards. Dylan was also a member of The Traveling Wilburys.

1942 - Derek Quinn: from the 1960s pop band Freddie and the Dreamers. They scored the 1963 UK No.3 single 'You Were made For Me', and the 1965 US No.1 single 'I'm Telling You Now.

1944 - Patti Labelle: American singer, songwriter, Patti Labelle who scored the 1975 US No.1 & UK No.17 single 'Lady Marmalade', (with Labelle), and the 1986 US No.1 & UK No.2 single with Michael McDonald, 'On My Own. Labelle became the first African-American vocal group to land the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.

1945 - Dave Peacock: English musician and bass guitarist Dave Peacock, who with Chas & Dave had the 1982 UK No.2 single 'Ain't No Pleasing You. Earlier in his career, Peacock played guitar as part of Cliff Bennett and the Rebel Rousers.

1946 - Steve Upton: from British rock band Wishbone Ash who scored the 1972 UK No.3 album Argus and eight other Top 40 albums. Wishbone Ash is noted for its extensive use of the harmony twin lead guitar.

1947 - Albert Bouchard: drummer, guitarist, songwriter, from American hard rock band Blue Oyster Cult who scored the 1976 US No.12 & 1978 UK No.16 single '(Don't Fear) The Reaper'. Blue Oyster Cult has sold over 24 million records worldwide.

1947 - Cynthia Plaster Caster: a groupie who became famous for making plaster casts of rock star’s penises and breasts. Clients included Jimi Hendrix and members from MC5, Television, The Kinks, and various road managers.

1955 - Rosanne Cash: American singer-songwriter and author, Rosanne Cash, the eldest daughter of country music icon Johnny Cash and his first wife, Vivian Liberto Cash Distin. She won a Grammy in 1985 for 'I Don't Know Why You Don't Want Me', and has received twelve other Grammy nominations. She has had 11 No.1 country hit singles, 21 Top 40 country singles, and two gold records.

1956 - Larry Blackmon: a lead singer with American soul-influenced funk group Cameo who scored the 1986 UK No.3 single 'Word Up'.

1960 - Guy Fletcher: multi-instrumentalist, who has worked with Roxy Music, (joined in 1981 for their Avalon world tour) and is best known for his position as the keyboard player in Dire Straits from 1984 until the group's dissolution.

1962 - Gene Ray: American singer, dancer Gene Anthony Ray, ‘Leroy’ in TV’s ‘Fame’. Axed from the show in 1984, after his mother was jailed for running a drug ring. He danced with The Weather Girls in their video of ‘It's Raining Men.’ Leroy died on November 19th, 2003.

1967 - Heavy 😧 Jamaican-born American rapper Heavy D, who scored the 1991 UK No.2 single 'Now That We Found Love' and the former leader of Heavy D & the Boyz. He died on November 8, 2011, in Los Angeles, California, at the age of 44.

1969 - Rich Robinson: guitarist with The Black Crowes (along with older brother Chris Robinson), who had the 1991 hit single 'Hard To Handle' and the 1992 US No.1 & UK No.2 album The Southern Harmony And Musical Companion. The band has sold more than 30 million albums.

1976 - Alessandro Cortini: Italian musician Alessandro Cortini best known for touring and recording with the American band Nine Inch Nails from 2004 to 2008.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe.  

MOHLovesAlaska

Oshawott
Up & Coming Artist

@MOHLovesAlaska  I had to stop by and check this out. thank you for your posts.

How long has the Arctic monkeys been going? Did they like first debut in 2007 or no?

I had a teacher who named her kid cash i think cash was the kids middle name. And she named him after johnny cash.

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Hello to you on this beautiful Tuesday night. And here is what happened on This Day In The History Of Music.

 

1961 - The Temperance Seven:  were at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'You're Driving Me Crazy', their only UK No.1 single. The song gave producer George Martin his first No.1.

1965 - Sonny Boy Williamson: Blues harmonica player, singer, and songwriter, Sonny Boy Williamson died in his sleep. Van Morrison, Aerosmith, The Who, The Animals, Yardbirds, and Moody Blues all covered his songs. According to the Led Zeppelin biography Hammer of the Gods, touring the UK in the 60s, Sonny Boy set his hotel room on fire while trying to cook a rabbit in a coffee percolator.

1967 - Procol Harum:  'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' entered the UK chart for the first time, where it went on to become a No.1 hit. 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' became the most played song in the last 75 years in public places in the UK (as of 2009). The first video for the song was shot in the ruins of Witley Court in Worcestershire, England. Directed by Peter Clifton whose insertion of Vietnam War newsreel footage caused it to be banned from airplay on the Top Of The Pops TV show. The band subsequently made another video.

1967 - Pink Floyd: appeared at the Gwent Constabulary ('A' Division) Spring Holiday Barn Dance, held at The Barn, Grosmont Wood Farm in Cross Ash, Wales, UK.

1968 - Simon and Garfunkel: scored their second US No.1 album with 'Bookends'. The album featured four US singles: 'A Hazy Shade of Winter', 'At the Zoo', 'Fakin' It', and 'Mrs. Robinson'.

1969 - Fairport Convention: A benefit concert was held for Fairport Convention at The Roundhouse, London to raise money for the families of the band's drummer Martin Lamble, Richard Thompson's girlfriend, and clothes designer Jeannie Franklyn who were all killed in an accident driving back from a gig. Also on the bill, Family, Pretty Things, Soft Machine and John Peel.

1969 - The Who and Led Zeppelin: appeared at the Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia, Maryland, USA. This was the only time the two groups's ever appeared together, with Zeppelin opening the show. On the tickets, Led Zeppelin has wrongfully spelled Lead Zeppelin.

1973 - Carole King: played a concert in New York's Central Park, which attracted an audience of 100,000.

1974 - Rick Wakeman: became the first member of the group, Yes to have a No.1 UK album when 'Journey To The Centre Of The Earth' went to the top of the charts.

1978 - Paul McGuinness: After seeing The Hype (soon to become U2) appearing at the Project Arts Centre, in Dublin, Paul McGuinness became their manager.

1985 - Dire Straits: scored their second UK No.1 album with 'Brothers In Arms', also No.1 in the US and 24 other countries. 'Brothers In Arms' was one of the first albums to be directed at the CD market, and was a full digital recording (DDD) at a time when most popular music was recorded on analog equipment. The album won two Grammy Awards at the 28th Grammy Awards, and also won Best British Album at the 1987 Brit Awards, and has gone on to sell over 30 million copies worldwide.

1992 - Khalil Roundtree: tour manager of Boyz II Men, was killed by gunfire after a scuffle in an elevator on the 26th floor of a hotel in Chicago; their assistant tour manager was also injured.

1995 - Mick Jagger: The earliest known recording of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, from 1961, was sold at Christie's in London for £50,250 ($85,425). 1997 - Elvis Presley: A report showed that Elvis Presley was now the world's bestselling posthumous entertainer with worldwide sales of over one billion, over 480 active fan clubs, and an estimated 250,000 UK fans who still buy his records. Ironically he had died owing $3 million (£1.76 million).

1997 - Bob Dylan: was diagnosed as suffering from histoplasmosis pericarditis, a fungal infection of the lung, and was admitted to hospital he stayed until June 2nd. Having just turned 56, Dylan later admitted: 'I really thought I'd be seeing Elvis soon. Treated by drugs and rest, Bob was back on the road only 10 weeks later, for 22 American and Canadian shows.

1998 - Coldplay: released their first-ever record, an EP called Safety, which featured 3 tracks; 'Bigger Stronger, 'No More Keeping My Feet on the Ground', and 'Such a Rush'. The EP was intended as a demo for record companies and is now such a rarity that it is known to fetch in excess of £2000 on eBay.

2001 - Noel Gallagher: Oasis guitarist Noel Gallagher won a damages settlement from The Daily Mirror after they claimed he lied in court during divorce proceedings with Meg Matthews.

2003 - Jemini: the UK entry for this year's Eurovision Song Contest, failed to get a single point, the first time a UK entry had ended up with nul points. The first null pointers came in 1962, six years after the contest started when four countries Austria, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Spain all failed to register.

2004 - Madonna: canceled three shows in Israel after terrorists threatened to kill her and her kids. A spokesperson said she was targeted because she symbolizes the West and not because she practices the Jewish faith Kabbalah.

2005 - The Rolling Stones: The Alameda County Sheriff's Office in California announced that it was officially closing the stabbing case of Meredith Hunter, the 18-year-old American who was killed at the 1969 Rolling Stones Altamont Free Concert. Investigators, concluding a renewed two-year investigation, dismissed the theory that a second Hell's Angel took part in the stabbing.

2006 - Desmond Dekker: Jamaican reggae singer, songwriter Desmond Dekker died of a heart attack at his home in London, England. Had one of the first international Jamaican hits in 1968, with the 'Israelites'.

2007 - Wayne Fontana: Sixties pop star Wayne Fontana was remanded in custody after admitting to pouring petrol over a bailiff's car and setting fire to it. The judge criticized the former lead singer of the Mindbenders, for arriving at Derby Crown Court dressed as the Lady of Justice. He had to hand a sword and scales to guards but still wore a crown, cape, and dark glasses, claiming "justice is blind".

2009 - Wilco: A former member of Wilco, who was suing the band over a royalties claim, died at his home in Illinois at the age of 45. Jay Bennett worked as a sound engineer and played instruments for the band between 1994 and 2001. Bennett filed his legal action against Wilco lead singer Jeff Tweedy at the beginning of May, claiming $50,000 (£33,160) for five albums he made with the group.

2013 - Marshall Lytle: American rock and roll bassist Marshall Lytle, died aged 79. He was best known for his work with the group Bill Haley & His Comets and The Jodimars in the 1950s. He played upright slap bass on the iconic 1950s rock and roll records 'Crazy Man, Crazy', 'Shake, Rattle and Roll', and 'Rock Around the Clock'.

Born On This Day In The Music World: 

1921 - Hal David: American songwriter, pianist, and arranger, who with Burt Bacharach wrote many classic songs including, 'Close To You', '24 Hours From Tulsa', 'Make It Easy On Yourself, 'Magic Moments', 'I Say A Little Prayer'. He won two Oscars for the film score to 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and for 'Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head'. David died from complications from a stroke on 1st Sept 2012 aged 91.

1936 - Donnie Elbert: American soul singer and songwriter Donnie Elbert, who had a 1972 US No.22 & UK No.11 single with ‘I Can’t Help Myself, Sugar Pie Honey Bunch’ and a hit with 'A Little Piece of Leather'. He died on January 26th, 1989.

1936 - Tom T. Hall: country music singer-songwriter. Hall has written 11 No.1 hit songs, with 26 more that reached the Top 10, including 'Harper Valley PTA' a hit for Jeannie C. Riley in 1968. He became known as 'The Storyteller,' due to his storytelling skills in his songwriting.

1942 - Brian Davison: from English progressive rock band The Nice, who had the 1968 UK hit single an instrumental rearrangement of Leonard Bernstein's 'America'. He died on 15 April 2008.

1943 - John Palmer: English rock musician John Palmer from Family who scored the 1971 UK No.4 single 'In My Own Time' and 1973 single 'My Friend The Sun'.

1947 - Mitchel Margo: from American male doo-wop-style vocal group The Tokens who had the 1961 US No.1 & UK No.11 single with its cover of Solomon Linda's 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight'

1948 - Klaus Meine: from German rock band Scorpions. Their 1990 power ballad 'Wind Of Change' topped the European charts and was a No.4 hit in the US. The Scorpions hold the record for the best-selling single by a German artist and band.

1950 - Jean Millington: from American all-female band Fanny who was active in the early 1970s. They were one of the first notable rock groups to be made up entirely of women.

1950 - Robert Steinhardt: from American rock band Kansas, who scored the 1978 US No.3 single 'Dust In The Wind', and 1978 hit single 'Carry On Wayward Son. which was the second-most-played track on US classic rock radio in 1995 and No.1 in 1997.

1955 - John Grimaldi: from English rock band Argent who had the 1972 UK No.5 single 'Hold Your Head Up' and the hit and 'God Gave Rock and Roll to You'.

1958 - Paul Weller: English singer, songwriter, musician Paul Weller, who with The Jam had the 1980 UK No.1 single 'Going Underground' plus 17 other UK Top 40 singles. With The Style Council the 1983 UK No.3 single 'Long Hot Summer', plus 14 other UK Top 40 singles. As a solo artist the 1995 UK No.7 single 'The Changing Man' and four UK No.1 albums. Weller has received four Brit Awards, winning the award for Best British Male twice, and the 2006 Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music.

1959 - Rick Smith: keyboards, from British electronic music group Underworld who had the 1996 UK No.2 single 'Born Slippy'.

1969 - Jody Porter: American musician Jody Porter, lead guitarist of Grammy Award-nominated power pop band Fountains of Wayne who had the 2003 Grammy-nominated single 'Stacy's Mom'.

1975 - Lauryn Hill: American singer, songwriter, rapper Lauryn Hill, who with The Fugees had the 1996 UK No.1 single 'Killing Me Softly'. As a solo artist had the 1998 UK No.3 single 'Doo Wop, That Thing', and the 1998 US No.1 & UK No.2 album The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill.

1980 - Fray: Joe King, guitarist, vocals, from American rock band The Fray who scored the 2005 US Top 3 single ‘How to Save a Life’. The group's self-titled, second album, released in 2009, debuted at No.1 on the Billboard charts.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Welcome to this much-needed rainy Wednesday afternoon here on The East Coast. Here is what happened on This Day In The History Of Music. 

 

1964 - Marianne Faithful: recorded the Mick Jagger and Keith Richards song 'As Tears Go By', accompanied by future Led Zeppelin members Jimmy Page on guitar and John Paul Jones on bass.

1966 - The Rolling Stones: were at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Paint It, Black', their sixth UK No.1 single. It was originally titled 'Paint It Black' without a comma. Keith Richards has stated that the comma was added by the record label, Decca. It was the first No.1 single to feature a sitar on the recording.

1966 - The Beatles: recorded 'Yellow Submarine' at Abbey Road studios in London. Recovering from a case of food poisoning, producer George Martin missed this recording, EMI engineer Geoff Emerick worked on the session. The track features John Lennon blowing bubbles in a bucket of water, shouting "Full speed ahead Mister Captain!"

1968 - Little Willie John: US blues artist Little Willie John died in prison after being convicted of manslaughter. Co-wrote and was the first to record a 'Fever' (covered by Peggy Lee in 1958), and 'Need Your Love So Bad' covered by Fleetwood Mac. James Brown recorded a tribute album 'Thinking Of Little Willie John... And A Few Other Nice Things'.

1968 - OZ Magazine Benefit: Pink Floyd, Blonde On Blonde, and The Pretty Things all appeared at the OZ magazine benefit at the Middle Earth Club, Covent Garden, London, England. OZ was a satirical humor magazine, founded by Richard Neville and based in Sydney, Australia in 1963. In its second and better known incarnation, it became a counter-culture magazine, based in London from 1967 to 1973.

1969 - John Lennon: and Yoko Ono began an eight-day 'bed in', in room 1742 of The Hotel La Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Canada, to promote world peace. They recorded 'Give Peace a Chance' in the hotel room (Petula Clark can be heard on the chorus). The song was credited to Lennon & McCartney, even though Paul had nothing to do with the record.

1972 - David Bowie: At the point of the band splitting up David Bowie offered Mott The Hoople two of his new songs, 'Suffragette City, which they turned down, and 'All The Young Dudes', which they recorded. The song gave the group a No.3 UK and US Top 40 hit.

1972 - Joe Cocker: The first day of the four-day UK festival 'The Great Western Express' near Lincoln featuring; the Faces, Joe Cocker, Humble Pie, Slade, The Groundhogs, Ry Cooder, Don McLean, Brewers Droop plus a special appearance by Monty Python.

1973 - Rick Derringer: The Edgar Winter Group went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Frankenstein', the band's only US No.1, it reached No.18 in the UK. The group featured ex McCoys guitarist Rick Derringer. In live performances of the song, Edgar Winter further pioneered the advancement of the synthesizer as a lead instrument by becoming the first person ever to strap a keyboard instrument around his neck.

1974 - David Cassidy: Tragedy struck at a David Cassidy concert at London's White City when over 1,000 fans had to be treated by first-aid workers due to the frenzied excitement. One fan Bernadette Whelan died from heart failure four days later.

1977 - Billy Powell: Billy Powell singer with The O'Jays died of cancer. (1972, hit 'Back Stabbers', 1973 US No.1 & UK No.9 single 'Love Train'). Originally known as The Triumphs, and then The Mascots, they took the name "The O'Jays", in tribute to radio disc jockey Eddie O'Jay.

1979 - Blondie: 'Sunday Girl' gave Blondie their second UK No.1 hit single. The track was taken from the group's 'Parallel Lines', which went on to become the biggest selling album of 1979.

1984 - Deniece Williams: Former backing singer with Stevie Wonder, Deniece Williams started a 2 week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Let's Hear It For The Boy', taken from the film 'Footloose, a No.2 hit in the UK.

1990 - Madonna: For the first time ever the top five positions on the US singles chart were held by female artists; Madonna was at No.1 with 'Vogue', Heart was at No.2, Sinead O’Connor No.3, Wilson Phillips at No.4 and Janet Jackson was at No.5.

1994 - Michael Jackson: married Lisa Marie Presley, daughter of Elvis Presley. The couple divorced in 1995. They had first met when the seven-year-old Presley attended several of Jackson's concerts in Las Vegas.

1995 - The Rolling Stones: played two semi-acoustic concerts at the Paradiso Amsterdam over two days. Keith Richards later said that the Paradiso concerts were the best live shows the Stones ever did. The venue is housed in a converted former church building that dates from the nineteenth century, subsequently squatted in 1967 by hippies who wanted to convert the church into an entertainment club. Artists who have recorded concerts at the Paradiso include Joy Division, Willie Nelson, Phish, Nirvana, The Cure, Lenny Kravitz, Nick Cave, Dave Matthews, and Amy Winehouse.

1996 - Eric Clapton: A fire at the home of Eric Clapton caused over one and a half million pounds worth of damage; Firemen arrived on the scene to find Clapton braving the blaze to save his collection of guitars.

2000 - Tommy Lee: Drummer Tommy Lee was jailed for five days for drinking alcohol. Lee appeared in front of a LA court charged with violating his probation by consuming alcohol, an act that directly contravenes the terms of his parole.

2002 - Ozzy Osbourne: The first episode of At Home With The Osbournes was shown on MTV in the UK. Already becoming a hit in the US, the show focused on the madman and his family (his wife Sharon, and two of their three children). Oblivious to the camera, they bicker, squabble, curse, and hang out backstage at Ozzy shows.

2009 - James Brown: A US judge ended a bitter two-year battle over the late soul singer James Brown's estate. Judge Jack Early ruled half of his assets will go to a charitable trust, a quarter to his wife and young son, and the rest to his six adult children. Brown's family and wife Tomi Rae Hynie Brown, had fought over his fortune since he died of heart failure in 2006.

2015 - B.B. King: US authorities were investigating the death of blues legend B.B. King after two of his daughters claimed he was poisoned. Karen Williams and Patty King said the musician had been given "foreign substances to induce his premature death" by his business manager Laverne Toney. King died in his sleep at his Las Vegas home on 14 May of this year, aged 89.

2016 - Pink Floyd: A set of stamps celebrating 50 years of Pink Floyd was unveiled by the Royal Mail. The ten stamps which would be available the following month marked five decades since the band turned professional. The collection included the band's most famous album covers as well as live performance shots.

2017 - Chris Cornell: was laid to rest at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles next to Johnny Ramone. Mourners at the funeral service include Dave Navarro, Tom Morello, Lars Ulrich, James Hetfield, Courtney Love, and his Soundgarden bandmates Matt Cameron and Kim Thayil. Cornell hanged himself on May 18, 2017.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1904 - George Formby: UK singing comedian and ukulele player. He made over 20 films and his best-known song is 'Leaning On A Lamp Post'. He was made an OBE in 1946 and died on March 6th, 1961. Formby was a major influence on George Harrison

1920 - Peggy Lee: American singer, actress, Peggy Lee, (real name: Norma Dolores Egstrom) who had the 1958 US No. 8 & UK No.5 single 'Fever', and worked with Benny Goodman, Randy Newman, Quincy Jones. She was nominated for 12 Grammy Awards, winning Best Contemporary Vocal Performance for her 1969 hit ‘Is That All There Is'. She died on 21st January 2002.

1926 - Miles Davis: jazz trumpeter and composer who had a 1959 album with Kind of Blue. He was a major influence on jazz music. Davis died on September 28th, 1991.

1938 - Jaki Liebezeit: German drummer, best known as a founding member of Can. Liebezeit died of pneumonia on 22 January 2017.

1940 - Levon Helm: drummer and singer with The Band. He died of throat cancer aged 71 on 19th April 2012. Helm formed his own high school band, the Jungle Bush Beaters, at 17, he later joined The Hawks (Ronnie Hawkins's backing group), who then became known as The Band and also backed Bob Dylan on his US tour in 1965 and world tour in 1966. Helm sang on Band classics like 'The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,' 'Up on Cripple Creek,' 'Rag Mama Rag,' and 'The Weight.'

1941 - Art Sharp: from English rock band, Nashville Teens who scored the 1964 UK No.6 single and US Top 20 hit 'Tobacco Road'.

1942 - Ray Ennis: from British Merseybeat band The Swinging Blue Jeans who had the 1964 UK No.2 single 'Hippy Hippy Shake' and the hit and 'You're No Good'. 3

1945 - Verden Allen: English musician Verden Allen a founding member of 1970s rock band Mott The Hoople, who had the 1972 UK No.3 & US No.37 single 'All The Young Dudes' which was written for them by David Bowie. Other hits include, 'All the Way from Memphis' and 'Roll Away the Stone'.

1945 - Gary Peterson: drummer from Canadian rock band Guess Who who had the 1970 US No.1 & UK No.19 single 'American Woman'.

1946 - Mick Ronson: English guitarist, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, arranger, and producer Mick Ronson. He was a member of The Rats, then worked with David Bowie from 1970, (1972 UK album The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars). Also worked with Mott The Hoople, Bob Dylan, and Ian Hunter. He released the 1974 UK No.9 solo album Slaughter On Tenth Avenue. Ronson died on April 29th, 1993.

1948 - Stevie Nicks: American singer-songwriter Stevie Nicks, from Fleetwood Mac who scored the 1987 UK No.5 single 'Little Lies' and 1977 US No.1 single 'Dreams', taken from the world-wide No.1 album Rumours. She scored the solo, 1981 US No.1 & UK No.11 album Bella Donna, and 1989 hit single 'Rooms On Fire'. Nicks joined Fleetwood Mac in 1975 along with her then-boyfriend, Lindsey Buckingham.

1949 - Hank Williams Jr: American singer-songwriter and musician Hank Williams Jr, the son of country music's greatest star. Williams began his career by following in his famed father's footsteps, covering his father's songs and imitating his father's style.

1959 - Wayne Hussey: English musician Wayne Hussey who was a member of Dead Or Alive, had the 1985 UK No.1 single 'You Spin me round, Like A record'. He joined Sisters Of Mercy, and then became the lead singer of The Mission who had the 1988 UK No.12 single 'Tower Of Strength'.

1962 - Colin Vearncombe: English singer-songwriter Colin Vearncombe, who with Black had the 1987 UK No.8 single 'Wonderful Life. Vearncombe was involved in a road traffic accident, on Jan 10th, 2016 near Cork Airport in Ireland, and placed in a medically-induced coma after sustaining serious head injuries. He died from his injuries at the intensive care unit of Cork University Hospital on 26 January 2016, at the age of 53.

1964 - Lenny Kravitz: American singer, songwriter, Lenny Kravitz, who had the 1990 UK hit single 'Let Love Rule', the 1999 UK No.1 single 'Fly Away', and the 1993 UK No.1 album 'Are You Gonna Go My Way'. Kravitz has also worked with Mick Jagger, Madonna, and David Bowie.

1967 - Kristen Pfaff: best known as the bassist for alternative rock band Hole. She was found dead on 16 June 1994 in her bathtub due to a heroin overdose aged 26. She died two months after Kurt Cobain, who was a close friend as well as the husband of Hole’s frontwoman Courtney Love.

1972 - Alan White: English rock drummer Alan White from Oasis. He is the longest-serving drummer in Oasis's history, performing on four studio albums. In early 2004, White left Oasis during the early recording sessions for the band's sixth album.

1978 - Jaheim Hoagland: (aka Jaheim), US R&B singer, (2006 US No.1 album ‘Ghetto Classics’).

1981 - Isaac Slade: lead singer and pianist, from American rock band The Fray who scored the 2005 US Top 3 single ‘How to Save a Life’. The group's self-titled, second album, released in 2009, debuted at No.1 on the Billboard charts.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

@Oshawott how have you been doing?? I know you have been busy with your schooling, but how are doing besides your business with school?? Well to answer your question, The Arctic Monkeys started in the very early 2000s, 2001-2003 somewhere within that time period. @Oshawott I wish you the very best in all that you do, especially in your schooling, and your dream of pursuing a music career (Songwriter or a Singer-Songwriter). Take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska
0 Kudos

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Thursday afternoon, Just a word of warning for all of you that may live in the same area as I do. Make sure you cover up your plants and gardens tonight, there is a frost warning advisory out. Now that, that is out of the way, here is what happened on This Day In The History Of Music. Have a great Thursday. 

 

1957 - Buddy Holly: and the Crickets released 'That'll Be The Day' which became a UK No.1 and US No.3 hit. The song had its genesis in a trip to the movies by Holly, Allison, and Sonny Curtis in June 1956. The John Wayne film The Searchers was playing. Wayne's frequently-used, world-weary catchphrase, "that'll be the day" was the inspiration behind the song. It was also the first song to be recorded by The Quarrymen, the skiffle group that subsequently became The Beatles.

1963 - Bob Dylan: The album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan was released by Columbia in the USA. Establishing Dylan as a leader in the singer-songwriter genre and a supposed spokesman for the youth-orientated protest movement, it reached No.22 in the US charts and No.1 in the UK charts. The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan showcased Dylan's songwriting talent for the first time and propelled him to national and international fame.

1964 - Mick Jagger: Eleven boys were suspended from a school in Coventry, England for having Mick Jagger haircuts.

1977 - Sex Pistols: single 'God Save The Queen' was released in the UK. Banned by TV and radio, high street shops and pressing plant workers refused to handle the record. It sold 200,000 copies in one week and peaked at No.2 on the UK charts behind Rod Stewart's 'I Don't Want to Talk About It'. There have been persistent rumors, (never confirmed or denied), that it was actually the biggest-selling single in the UK at the time, and the British Phonographic Industry conspired to keep it off the No.1 slot.

1983 - The Smiths: were at No.1 on the UK independent chart with their debut single 'Hand In Glove.' The Smiths recorded the track after their manager Joe Moss paid £250 for a one-day recording session at Strawberry Studios in Stockport, England.

1988 - Def Leppard: kicked off the third leg of their North American Hysteria world tour at George M. Sullivan Arena, Anchorage, Alaska.

1989 - Cliff Richard: released his one-hundredth single, 'The Best Of Me', which became his 26th Top 3 UK hit.

1990 - The Stone Roses: played at Spike Island, Widnes, Cheshire, England to a capacity crowd of 30,000. The event, considered a failure at the time due to sound problems and bad organization, has become legendary over the years as a "Woodstock for the baggy generation."

1994 -The Eagles: played their first show in fourteen years when they played a show in Burbank, California. The two-and-a-half-hour show ended with two encores, closing with 'Desperado'.

1997 - Liam Gallagher: Oasis singer Liam Gallagher was left with cuts and bruises after a scuffle with youth at the Tower Thistle Hotel in east London. Members of the band had been drinking at the bar when the fight broke out.

1999 - Rod Stewart: Winners at the Ivor Novello songwriting awards included Rod Stewart who won a Lifetime Achievement Award, Robbie Williams and Guy Chambers won songwriters of the year and Chrissie Hynde won outstanding contribution to British Music.

2000 - Paula Yates: was awarded £400,000 ($680,000) in an out-of-court settlement from her boyfriend Michael Hutchence's fortune. Hutchence had died in 1997 INXS singer Hutchence was found dead in his hotel suite in Sydney in 1997 aged 37.

2005 - Robbie Williams: was voted into first place beating Elvis Presley, Jimi Hendrix and David Bowie to be named the best live solo artist. A UK nationwide survey of 5,000 people saw the former Take That star beat music icons including Madonna, Michael Jackson, and Bob Dylan. U2 was named best live band, ahead of Queen and Oasis, in a poll by Carling to celebrate the UK's live music scene.

2007 - Kurt Cobain: Saatchi & Saatchi were fired by Dr. Martens for running an advertising campaign featuring dead rock stars such as Kurt Cobain and Sid Vicious wearing the brand's boots in heaven. David Suddens, the chief executive of Dr. Martens's parent company Airwear, said the brand had not commissioned the series of four print ads. "Dr. Martens are very sorry for any offense that has been caused by the publication of images showing dead rock icons wearing Dr. Martens boots."

2008 - Paul McCartney: Sir Paul McCartney was awarded an honorary Doctor of Music degree from Yale University in the United States. Yale's president, Richard Levin, said; The former Beatle had 'awakened a generation, giving a fresh sound to rock and roll and to rhythm and blues. A band played ‘Hey Jude’ as Sir Paul, 65, walked on stage to accept his degree.

2008 - Woolworths: UK High street chain Woolworths announced it would stop selling CD singles in its stores saying that the format was in "terminal decline" and would be removed from the shelves from August. Sales of CD singles had fallen sharply as the popularity of downloading music from the internet had increased.

2009 - Courtney Love: A credit card company sued Courtney Love, claiming she owed more than $350,000 (£220,000). In court papers filed in Los Angeles, American Express said it had suspended Love's Amex Gold card after she "failed and refused" to make payments.

2010 - AC/DC: Dozens of AC/DC fans needed treatment after complaining of burning eyes during a concert on the runway of Wels Airport, Wels, Austria. Around 150 fans had to be treated. Doctors found that the fans showed allergic reactions to bark mulch spread at the venue - the runway of Wels Airport, to avoid the soil getting too muddy after hours of massive rainfall.

2013 - Mobile Phones: A report was published saying how many musicians were frustrated with fans filming gigs on their smartphones. Jack White and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs had both put up signs at their concerts asking people to leave their mobiles in their pockets.

2017 - The Allman Brothers Band: Gregg Allman, founding member of The Allman Brothers Band died at the age of 69 at his home in Savannah, Georgia. Allman had suffered a recurrence of liver cancer five years ago, died from complications of the disease. The band’s main songwriter early on, Allman contributed compositions like 'Dreams' and 'Whipping Post' to the Allman Brothers repertoire. Both songs became staples of their live shows; a cathartic 22-minute version of 'Whipping Post' was a highlight of their acclaimed 1971 live album, At Fillmore East.

Born On This Day In The Music World: 

1935 - Rudy Lewis: from American doo-wop and R&B vocal group The Drifters who had the 1960 US No.1 & UK No.2 single 'Save The Last Dance For Me' and over 12 other chart hits. He died on May 10th, 1964.

1935 - Ramsey Lewis: American jazz composer, pianist, and radio personality who had the 1965 US No.5 single 'The In Crowd', and the 1972 hit single 'Wade In The Water'.

1943 - Cilla Black: Priscilla White (Cilla Black), singer, TV presenter, 1964 UK No.1 single 'Anyone Who Had A Heart' plus 18 other UK Top 40 singles). Black died at her holiday home near Marbella, Spain, on 1 August 2015. She was 72.

1944 - Billy Adamson: drummer with The Searchers from 1969 to 1998, (the longest-serving drummer in the group). He died on 11 November 2013.

1947 - Marty Kristian: singer from The New Seekers who had the 1972 UK No.1 and US No.7 single 'I'd Like To Teach The World To Sing' and hits with 'You Won't Find Another Fool Like Me' and 'Beg, Steal or Borrow'.

1947 - Peter Knight: violinist with English folk-rock band Steeleye Span who formed in 1969. They had the 1975 UK No.5 single 'All Around My Hat' and a hit with 'Gaudete'.

1948 - Pete Sears: English rock musician Pete Sears, who has worked with many artists including Jefferson Starship, and Rod Stewart on his Every Picture Tells a Story including the hit singles 'Maggie May' and 'Reason To Believe'.

1957 - Eddie Harsch: keyboardist with The Black Crowes who had the 1991 hit single 'Hard To Handle' and the 1992 US No.1 & UK No.2 album The Southern Harmony And Musical Companion. The band has sold more than 30 million albums.

1957 - Siouxsie Sioux: Susan Janet Ballion, (Siouxsie Sioux), vocals, Siouxsie And The Banshees, 1983 UK No.3 single 'Dear Prudence', plus over 15 other UK Top 40 singles). Also a member of The Creatures, (1983 UK No.14 single 'Right Now').

1958 - Neil Finn: guitar, vocals, from New Zealand group Split Enz who had the 1980 UK No.12 single 'I Got You'. Split Enz had ten albums (including seven studio albums) reach the top ten of the Official New Zealand Music Chart. And with Crowded House had the 1992 UK No.7 single 'Weather With You' and a hit with 'It's Only Natural'. Finn has released many solo albums and replaced Lindsey Buckingham in Fleetwood Mac as part of their 2018 tour.

1966 - Sean Kinney: American musician, best known for being the drummer and co-founder of the rock band Alice in Chains.

1971 - Lisa Lopes: Left-Eye, singer with American girl group TLC. They scored nine top-ten hits on the Billboard Hot 100, including four No.1 singles, 'Creep', 'Waterfalls', 'No Scrubs', and 'Unpretty'. Their 1999 US No.1 album Fanmail spent 57 weeks on the UK chart. Having sold over 65 million records worldwide, TLC is the best-selling American girl group. Lopes was killed in a car accident on April 25th, 2002 aged 30.

1975 - André 3000: Dre, (Andre Benjamin), American rapper, singer, a songwriter who with Outkast had the 2001 US No.1 & UK No.2 single 'Ms. Jackson.' In 2015, Billboard included Benjamin on its list of the 10 Greatest Rappers of All Time.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Welcome back from a nice four-day weekend with family and friends. Even though it rained three out of the four days, and temps never getting above 50, we still had a great Memorial Day weekend, I hope you all had a great one as well. This Day In The History Of Music for this Tuesday. 

 

1959 - Juke Box Jury: The first edition of Juke Box Jury aired on the BBC. The show's host, David Jacobs, lead a revolving panel of guests in critiquing the week's top record releases. Although the songs were never played in their entirety, the four judges gave a verdict on whether each would be a "hit" or a "miss".

1959 - Johnny Horton: 'The Battle Of New Orleans' by Johnny Horton went to No.1 on both the Country and Pop charts in the US, where it will stay for two months. The song was originally a poem written by high school teacher James Morriss in 1936, which he put to the music of an old fiddle tune known as 'The Eighth Of January'. Horton later won a Grammy Award for the song.  

1961 - Elvis Presley: was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Surrender, his eighth UK No.1. The song was based on the 1911 Italian song, 'Return To Sorrento.'  

1963 - Lesley Gore: started a two-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with Quincy Jones (then a staff producer for Mercury Records) produced 'It's My Party, a No.9 hit in the UK. Dave Stewart and Barbara Gaskin scored a UK No.1 in 1981 with their version of the song.  

1964 - The Rolling Stones: were met by over 500 fans as they arrived on BA flight 505 at Kennedy Airport for their debut US tour. The Stones held a press conference and then guested on the prestigious "5th Beatle", DJ Murray The K's radio show. The first date took place on 5th June in San Bernardino, California.  

1966 - The Beatles: During a 12-hour session at Abbey Road studios, The Beatles added overdubs on 'Yellow Submarine, with John Lennon blowing bubbles in a bucket of water and shouting "Full speed ahead Mister Captain!" Roadie Mal Evans played on the bass drum strapped to his chest, marching around the studio with The Beatles following behind (conga-line style) singing "We all live in a yellow submarine."  

1967 - The Beatles: released Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, in the UK. Recorded over a 129-day period beginning in December 1966, the album is widely regarded as one of the greatest of all time and was the first Beatles album where the track listings were exactly the same for the UK and US versions. As of 2011, it has sold more than 32 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling albums in history.  

1967 - David Bowie: released his self-titled debut studio album. Two singles were released from the album, 'Rubber Band' and 'The Laughing Gnome'. The album's failure cost Bowie his record contract with Deram Records who dropped him in April 1968. 

1968 - Simon and Garfunkel: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Mrs. Robinson'. Featured in the Dustin Hoffman and Ann Bancroft film 'The Graduate', the song earned the duo a Grammy Award for Record of the Year in 1969.  

1969 - John Lennon: The Plastic Ono Band recorded 'Give Peace A Chance' during a 'stay-in-bed' at the Hotel La Reine in Montreal, Canada. Producer Phil Spector, poet Allan Ginsberg, and writer Timothy Leary all sang the song.  

1971 - Elvis Presley: The two-room shack in Tupelo, Mississippi, where Elvis Presley was born on January 8, 1935, was opened to the public as a tourist attraction.   1972 - The Eagles: released their debut studio album. The album was an immediate success and produced three top 40 singles 'Take It Easy, 'Witchy Woman, and 'Peaceful Easy Feeling'.  

1973 - Robert Wyatt: Former Soft Machine drummer Robert Wyatt broke his spine after attempting to leave a party by climbing down a drainpipe and falling three stories. It left Wyatt permanently crippled and confined to a wheelchair.  

1975 - The Rolling Stones: kicked off their biggest ever US tour at Louisiana State University. The tour would take 45 shows in 26 cities. Guitarist Ronnie Wood joined The Stones on tour for the first time, replacing Mick Taylor. 

1977 - Bob Marley and The Wailers: played the first of four nights at the Rainbow Theatre in London. There were six nights booked at the Rainbow, but the last two shows were canceled due to a serious toe injury Marley received, (in a friendly football game with French journalists just before the tour's start in Paris). Subsequently, the tour's second leg in the United States was postponed and then canceled.  

1981 - AC/DC: The first issue of the Heavy Metal magazine Kerrang! was published as a special pull-out by UK weekly music paper Sounds. AC/DC had the front cover plus features on Motorhead, Girlschool, and Saxon.  

1985 - Prince: & The Revolution started a three-week run at No.1 on the US album chart with Around The World In A Day.  

1991 - David Ruffin: American soul singer David Ruffin died of a drug overdose. After taking a large amount of cocaine Ruffin passed out, a friend drove him to a hospital in Philadelphia, where he later died. With The Temptations, had the 1971 US No.1 & UK No. 8 single 'Just My Imagination and 'My Girl' (which Ruffin sang lead vocals). Solo, (1975 US No.9 & UK No.10 single 'Walk Away From Love')  

1997 - Baby Spice: Spice Girl Emma Bunton, (Baby Spice) arrived back in the UK at Heathrow airport in a wheelchair after breaking her ankle during a Turkish TV show.  

2003 - Paul Gray: Slipknot bassist Paul Gray was arrested on drugs and drink-driving charges after he collided with a car after going through a red light in his hometown of Des Moines, Iowa. Gray, (who wears a pig mask on stage) then tried to write a cheque for $1,000 (£600) to the other driver, who then called the police. Gray failed two alcohol tests at the scene and was arrested for possession of marijuana, cocaine, and drug paraphernalia, as well as drink-driving.  

2005 - Crazy Frog: was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Axel F'. It started as a mobile phone ring tone, the single is based on Harold Faltermeyer's film theme, which reached No.2 in 1985.  

2006 - Oasis: The 1994 debut album by Oasis, Definitely Maybe was voted the greatest album of all time in a survey to mark 50 years of the Official UK Albums Chart. The Beatles came in second and third place with Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and Revolver, OK Computer by Radiohead was fourth, and (What's the Story) Morning Glory by Oasis was voted fifth.  

2007 - Sgt. Pepper: Contemporary musicians recorded their own versions of songs from the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper album to mark 40 years since it was released. Acts including Oasis, Travis, The Fray, Kaiser Chiefs, Razorlight, Bryan Adams, and The Magic Numbers all worked with Geoff Emerick - the engineer in charge of the original 1967 sessions, using the original analog 4-track equipment to demonstrates the techniques employed for the recording at Abbey Road studios in 1967.  

2013 - Vampire Weekend: Modern Vampires of the City by Vampire Weekend went to No.1 on the US album charts. Their sophomore album 'Contra' also debuted at No.1 in 2010, making this the first time an independent rock band had entered at No.1 with two consecutive releases. 'Modern Vampires of the City also shattered the previous record for first-week vinyl sales, moving nearly 10,000 units.  

2016 - Ed Sheeran: was revealed as the most-played pop act in the UK in 2015. The singer topped the music royalty body Phonographic Performance Ltd's (PPL) chart, which is based on TV and radio airplay, adverts, and plays in venues like pubs and clubs. Mark Ronson's 'Uptown Funk' was the most-played song of the year, ahead of Ellie Goulding's 'Love Me Like You Do' and James Bay's'Hold Back The River.  

2017 - Jerry Garcia: The sale of Jerry Garcia's favorite guitar, Wolf, raised millions of dollars for a civil rights group when an auction of the custom-made guitar fetched a total of $3.2m (£2.5m). It was bought at a New York charity concert by Brian Halligan, CEO of marketing group HubSpot and a lifelong fan of the band - or a "Deadhead". The money raised would go to the Southern Poverty Law Centre.  

Born On This Day In The Music World:  

1934 - Pat Boone: American singer, composer, actor, Pat Boone, who had the 1956 UK No.1 single 'I'll Be Home', and the 1957 US No.1 single 'Love Letters In The Sand'. Boone was the second-biggest charting artist of the late 1950s, behind only Elvis Presley.  

1943 - Tom Bahler: American singer, songwriter, arranger, producer, Tom Bahler, (the younger brother of singer, John Bahler). He is most known for his song, 'She's Out of My Life', recorded by Michael Jackson for his Off The Wall album. The song was originally written for Frank Sinatra who never recorded it. Together with the Wrecking Crew, the Bahler brothers have sung, produced, and arranged hundreds of worldwide hits. They were the featured background voices on The Partridge Family recordings in the 1970s.  

1945 - James William McCarty: guitarist, Mitch Ryder, and The Detroit Wheels, Buddy Miles, Cactus, Mystery Train, Bob Seger.  

1947 - Ron Wood: guitarist, songwriter, painter, and radio presenter. Originally a member of the UK band The Birds, he first worked alongside Rod Stewart in the Jeff Beck Group. He then got together with three members of The Small Faces to form the Faces joined by Rod on vocals. His songwriting partnership with Rod extended to Rod's early solo albums. Wood joined The Rolling Stones in 1975 after the departure of Mick Taylor.  

1950 - Charlene: American easy-listening singer who had the 1982 UK No.1 & US No.3 single 'I've Never Been To Me.  

1950 - Tom Robinson: singer, songwriter, radio presenter, and long-time LGBT rights activist. He was a member of Cafe Society, Sector 27, and scored the 1977 UK No.5 single with Tom Robinson Band, '2-4-6-8- Motorway', plus 'Glad to Be Gay, 'Don't Take No for an Answer, and the solo single 'War Baby'.

1950 - Graham Russell: guitar, vocals for the Australian soft rock band Air Supply who scored the 1980 UK No.11 single 'All Out Of Love' and the 1981 US No.1 single 'The One That You Love'.

1952 - John Ellis: guitarist from British punk rock band The Vibrators who had the 1978 UK No.35 single 'Automatic Lover'.

1958 - Michael Landau: American musician, engineer, and record producer and session musician Michael Landau who has worked with Boz Scaggs, Joni Mitchell, Seal, Michael Jackson, James Taylor, Richard Marx, Steve Perry, Pink Floyd, Roger Daltrey, Glenn Frey, and Miles Davis.

1959 - Alan Wilder: keyboards, vocals, with English electronic band Depeche Mode. The group has had 50 songs in the UK Singles Chart and seventeen top 10 albums in the UK chart and has sold over 100 million records worldwide.

1960 - Simon Gallup: bassist with English rock band The Cure who had the 1989 US No.2 single 'Love Song', the 1992 UK No.6 single 'Friday I'm In Love', plus over 20 other UK Top 40 singles.

1963 - Mike Joyce: drummer with English rock band The Smiths who had the 1984 UK No.10 single 'Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now', plus 15 other UK Top 40 singles. In 1996, Joyce sued former Smiths' colleagues Johnny Marr and Morrissey for an equal share of performance and recording royalties. Joyce won the case and was awarded damages of around one million pounds from Morrissey and Marr.

1967 - Roger Sanchez: Dominican-American house music DJ Roger Sanchez, who had the 2001 UK No.1 single 'Another Chance'. He was a Grammy Award Winner for his remix of 'Hella Good' by No Doubt in 2003 and won the first International Dance Music Award for Best Podcast in 2007.

1968 - Jason Donovan: Australian actor, singer who had the 1989 UK No.1 single 'Too Many Broken hearts' plus 15 other UK Top 40 hit singles. His debut album Ten Good Reasons was one of the highest-selling albums of 1989.

1969 - Damon Minchella: bassist with English rock band Ocean Colour Scene who formed in Moseley, Birmingham in 1989. They scored the 1996 UK No.4 single 'The Day We Caught The Train', plus over 12 other Top 40 singles and the 1997 UK No.1 album Marchin’ Already.

1974 - Alanis Morissette: Canadian-American, singer, songwriter, who had the 1996 US No.4 & UK No.11 single 'Ironic' from Jagged Little Pill which has sold more than 30 million copies, making it the best ever selling record by a female performer. Morissette appeared on the Canadian children's television show You Can't Do That for five episodes when she was in elementary school and has now sold more than 60 million albums worldwide.

1981 - Brandi Carlile: American alternative country and folk-rock singer-songwriter Brandi Carlile. Her 2007 single 'The Story, from the album of the same name, was a commercial success and was used by General Motors for commercials.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Seems rare to be able to post early. Good Wednesday afternoon. This Day In The History Of Music for this Wednesday. 

 

1957 - Johnnie Ray: was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Yes Tonight Josephine', the US singer's third and final UK No.1. Ray became deaf in his right ear at age 13 after an accident during a Boy Scout "blanket toss," a variation of the trampoline. (Ray later performed wearing a hearing aid).

1962 - Owen Gray:'Twist Baby' became the first single released on UK-based Island Records. The label became home to Free, Traffic, Jethro Tull, Bob Marley, and U2.

1962 - Ray Charles: started a five-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with the Don Gibson penned country ballad 'I Can't Stop Loving You', also No.1 in the UK.

1963 - The Rolling Stones: played two gigs in one day. The first at Studio 51, Ken Colyer Club in Soho, London. The Stones played a regular Sunday afternoon gig at the club from 4 until 6.30 and were billed as Rhythm and Blues with The Rolling Stones. That evening they appeared at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond, Surrey.

1966 - Frank Sinatra: was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Strangers In The Night', the singer's second UK No.1. The song was originally composed by Avo Uvezian as 'Broken Guitar' and later under the title 'Beddy Bye' as part of the instrumental score for the movie A Man Could Get Killed.

1972 - Pink Floyd: released Obscured By Clouds in the UK. The album which was recorded in Paris France in less than two weeks peaked at No.6 on the UK chart and No.46 on the US chart.

1973 - Paul McCartney: had both the No.1 positions on the US charts when 'Red Rose Speedway, went to the top of the album chart and 'My Love', started a four week run as the No.1 single.

1976 - Paul McCartney: Wings set a new world record when they performed in front of 67,100 fans in Seattle, the largest attendance for an indoor crowd.

1978 - Thin Lizzy: released the live double album Live And Dangerous. It was recorded in Philadelphia, London, and Toronto in 1977, during the tours accompanying the albums Johnny The Fox and Bad Reputation. It peaked at No.2 on the UK album charts, held from the top spot by the Grease soundtrack album. It remained in the charts for 62 weeks and eventually sold 600,000 copies.

1979 - Donna Summer: started a three-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Hot Stuff', her second US No.1, it made No.11 in the UK. 1981 - Prince: made his live British debut at The Lyceum Ballroom, London, (he would not play the UK again for five years).

1984 - Andrew Ridgeley: Wham! had their first UK No.1 with 'Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go.' Written and produced by George Michael, one-half of the duo. Inspiration for the song was a scribbled note left by his Wham! partner Andrew Ridgeley for Andrew's parents originally intended to read "wake me up before you go" but with "up" accidentally written twice, so Ridgeley wrote "go" twice on purpose.

1989 - Bill Wyman: Rolling Stone Bill Wyman secretly married 19-year-old Mandy Smith. Wyman's 28-year-old son was the best man. All other four Stones attended. The marriage lasted 17 months.

1999 - Junior Braithwaite: from Bob Marley and the Wailers was shot dead aged 46. Braithwaite was one of the founders of and the first lead singer of The Wailers.

2002 - Paul McCartney: It was reported that Paul McCartney had thrown his fiance' Heather Mills' engagement ring out of a hotel window during a row. Guards at Miami's Turnberry Isle Resort combed the grounds using metal detectors and later found the £15,000 ($25,500) ring.

2003 - Kylie Minogue: A painting of Kylie Minogue wearing gold hot pants caused tempers to fray among drivers in Brighton. Artist Simon Etheridge, put up the almost life-size picture in his own Art Asylum gallery, as part of a Festival and since then motorists had caused regular traffic hold-ups as they stopped to take a second look.

2005 - Alex Kapranos: Franz Ferdinand's frontman, Alex Kapranos was detained by Russian police after being suspected of being a spy. Kapranos was attempting to board a plane in Moscow when the altercation took place. Traveling under his actual surname, Huntley, Alex was accused of being an MI6 agent who was previously suspected of stealing information on Russian weaponry. Unlucky for Alex that the surname Huntley was also used by actual former MI6 agent Richard Tomlinson who did steal secrets in the early 90s. The singer was freed after he pointed out that the Huntley they were so concerned about was 42, 13 years older than him.

2008 - Bo Diddley: American guitarist and singer Bo Diddley, (Ellas Otha Bates) died of heart failure at his home in Archer, Florida aged 79. The legendary singer and performer were known for his homemade square guitar and his 'shave and a haircut, two bits' rhythm, which influenced artists from Buddy Holly to Bruce Springsteen The Rolling Stones, and U2.

2016 - David Bowie: The limited-edition vinyl pressing of the David Bowie album ChangesOneBowie was at No.1 on the UK’s Official Vinyl Album Chart. Bowie had four other vinyl albums on the chart; Blackstar at No.14, Hunky Dory at No. 17, The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars at No. 18, and Nothing Has Changed - The Very Best of David Bowie at No.23. Sales of vinyl records were up 32% to $416 million, their highest level since 1988, according to the RIAA.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1936 - Otis Williams: singer, from the American doo-wop vocal group The Charms, who had the 1956 US No.11 single 'Ivory Tower'.

1937 - Jimmy Jones: American singer-songwriter Jimmy Jones, who had the 1960 UK No.1 & US No.3 single 'Good Timin and the hit 'Handy Man'. He died on August 2, 2012, aged 75.

1939 - Janie Bradford: American songwriter Janie Bradford, most known for her tenure with Motown. With Berry Gordy, she co-wrote 'Money (That's What I Want)', originally recorded by Barrett Strong, and then by The Beatles on their second album With The Beatles. 'Money' is also on The Rolling Stones' first UK EP (January 17, 1964).

1941 - Charlie Watts: an English drummer who joined The Rolling Stones in 1963 and had the 1965 UK & US No.1 single ’(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction and over 35 Top 40 singles and albums. Watts also plays occasional gigs with Charlie Watts and his Big Band. In 2006, Watts was elected into the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame.

1941 - William Guest: a singer with The Pips. Their first hit single was a version of 'I Heard It Through the Grapevine' in 1967. With Gladys Knight had the 1973 US No.1 single 'Midnight Train To Georgia', and the 1975 UK No.4 single with Gladys 'The Way We Were'. Guest died on 24th Dec 2015 of heart failure at the age of 74.

1944 - Marvin Hamlisch: A pianist, composer, 1974 US No.1 album 'The Sting', US No.3 single 'The Entertainer.' He won four Grammy Awards in 1974, two for 'The Way We Were'. In 1975, he wrote the original theme music for Good Morning America and co-wrote 'Nobody Does It Better for The Spy Who Loved Me with his then-girlfriend Carole Bayer Sager. Hamlisch died on August 6, 2012.

1945 - David Dundas: Lord David Dundas, an English musician, and actor, known for his film and television scoring. His 1976 single 'Jeans On' reached No. 3 in the UK and No. 17 on the US Billboard Hot 100.

1950 - Chubby Tavares: from American R&B, funk, and soul group Tavares, who had the 1976 UK No.4 and US No.15 single 'Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel'.

1959 - Michael Steele: American bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and singer who began her professional career as Micki Steele in the teen-girl band the Runaways. With The Bangles she scored the 1986 UK No.2 hit single with the Prince song 'Manic Monday', and the 1986 US No.1 single 'Walk Like An Egyptian'.

1960 - Tony Hadley: English pop singer-songwriter with Spandau Ballet who became one of the most successful groups to emerge during the New Romantic era and have produced a number of international hits during the 80s including 'True', 'Gold' and 'Through the Barricades.' In 2003 Hadley was the winner of the ITV reality television series Reborn in the USA and in 2007, Hadley performed in the West End musical Chicago.

1965 - Jeremy Cunningham: bassist, with English folk-rock band The Levellers who had the 1995 UK No.12 single 'Just The One.

1970 - Louis Freeze: B-Real, from Cypress Hill, who had the 1993 UK No.15 single 'I Ain't Goin' Out Like That', and the 1993 US No.1 album 'Black Sunday'.

1970 - Dominic Greensmith: drummer with English band Reef who had the 1996 UK No. 6 single ‘Place Your Hands and the 1997 UK No.1 album ‘Glow'.

1976 - Tim Rice-Oxley: A piano, producer, singer, and multi-instrumentalist with Keane. Their 2004 UK No.1 album Hopes And Fears was the second best-selling British album of the year. In 2010 he formed a side-project, Mt. Desolation.

1980 - Fabrizio Moretti: Brazilian-American musician and drummer from American rock band The Strokes who had the 2001 UK No.14 single 'Last Nite' and the 2001 UK No.2 album Is This It.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Thursday morning, here is what happened on This Day In The History Of Music. Enjoy your day.

 

1953 - Elvis Presley: graduated from J.C. Hulmes High School in Memphis; his graduation photo shows him to have a split curl in the middle of his forehead, later to become his trademark. He was the first member of his family to graduate high school.

1964 - Ringo Starr: During a photo session Ringo Starr was taken ill suffering from tonsillitis and pharyngitis, days before a world tour was about to start. After a last-minute phone call from George Martin, session drummer Jimmy Nichol rushed over to EMI Studios, where he and The Beatles ran through six songs from their tour repertoire in a quick rehearsal. Nichol replaced Ringo and became a Beatle for eleven days.

1967 - Aretha Franklin: went to No.1 on the US singles chart with her version of the Otis Redding hit 'Respect'. A No.10 hit on the UK chart. Aretha scored her first UK No.1 20 years later with a duet with George Michael's 'I Knew You Were Waiting.

1967 - The Doors: 'Light My Fire' was released in the US, where it went on to be No.1 on the singles chart two months later. When The Doors were booked to appear on The Ed Sullivan Show they were asked to change the line "girl, we couldn't get much higher", as the sponsors were uncomfortable with the possible reference to drug-taking. The band agreed to do so, and did a rehearsal using the amended lyrics; however, during the live performance, lead singer Jim Morrison sang the original lyric, after which they were informed they would never appear on the Ed Sullivan show again.

1968 - Andy Warhol: Valerie Solanas shot Andy Warhol and art critic and curator Mario Amaya at Warhol's studio in New York City. Solanas had been to see Warhol after asking for the return of a script which had apparently, been misplaced. Warhol was seriously wounded in the attack and barely survived.

1970 - Deep Purple: released their fourth studio album 'Deep Purple In Rock'. This was the first album to feature the classic Mk II lineup of - Ritchie Blackmore, Ian Gillan, Roger Glover, Jon Lord, and Ian Paice.

1970 - Ray Davies: The Kinks Ray Davies was forced to make a 6,000 mile round trip from New York to London to record one word in a song. Davies had to change the word 'Coca- Cola' to 'Cherry Cola' on the band's forthcoming single 'Lola' due to an advertising ban at BBC Radio.

1972 - The Rolling Stones: kicked off their seventh North American tour at the Pacific Coliseum, Vancouver, Canada. The 32 date tour grossed $4 million (£2.35 million), making it the richest rock tour in history.

1977 - Bob Marley & the Wailers: released Exodus. The album featured the hits, 'Jamming', 'Waiting In Vain', 'Three Little Birds' and 'One Love'. In 1999, Time magazine named Exodus the best album of the 20th century.

1983 - Jim Gordon: US session drummer Jim Gordon murdered his mother by beating her head with a hammer. A diagnosed schizophrenic, it was not until his trial in 1984 that he was properly diagnosed. Due to the fact that his attorney was unable to use the insanity defense, Gordon was sentenced to sixteen years to life in prison in 1984. A Grammy Award winner for co-writing Layla with Eric Clapton, Gordon worked with The Beach Boys, John Lennon, George Harrison Frank Zappa, and many other artists.

1995 - Bryan Adams: started a five-week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman' Taken from the film 'Don Juan De Marco' it became Adams third US solo No.1, a No.4 hit in the UK.

2000 - Kenny Chesney and Tim McGraw: were arrested in Buffalo, New York after Chesney ran away with a Mounted Reserve deputy's horse, and McGraw attacked deputies that tried to corral him. Chesney asked to sit on the horse, and the daughter of the deputy gave him permission to do so. Then Chesney mounted the horse and rode away. He was told to stop but ignored the orders from the other deputies, the deputies were then attacked by McGraw and members of his entourage. Chesney was charged with disorderly conduct and released on bail. McGraw was charged with second-degree assault, obstructing governmental administration, menacing and resisting arrest. He was released on $2,500 bail. (Boys will be boys).

2002 - Ozzy Osbourne: Paul McCartney, Sting, Elton John, Brian Wilson, Cliff Richard, Ozzy Osbourne, The Corrs, Will Young, Atomic Kitten, and S Club 7 all appeared at The Queen's Jubilee concert at Buckingham Palace, London.

2003 - Barry Manilow: Barry Manilow suffered a broken nose after he accidentally walked into a wall at his home in Palm Springs, California, and knocked himself unconscious. Although he passed out for four hours, he didn't endure any lasting effects as doctors determined that surgery was not necessary.

2006 - Red Hot Chili Peppers: Red Hot Chili Peppers were at No.1 on the UK and US album charts with Stadium Arcadium the band's ninth studio album.

2011 - Andrew Gold: American singer, songwriter Andrew Gold died in his sleep aged 59 from a heart attack. Had the 1977 US No.7 single 'Lonely Boy', 1978 UK No.5 single 'Never Let Her Slip Away, and as a member of Wax the 1987 UK No.12 single 'Bridge To Your Heart'.

2016 - Dave Swarbrick: English folk musician and singer-songwriter Dave Swarbrick died aged 75. His work for the group Fairport Convention from 1969 has been credited with leading them to produce their seminal album Liege & Lief (1969) which initiated the electric folk movement.

2019 - Miley Cyrus: was promoting her latest EP ‘She Is Coming’ with condoms. Fans who bought her $20 branded condoms would receive a digital download of her new music.

2019 - George Michael: Court paperwork showed that George Michael left all of his £98 million fortunes to family and friends and left nothing to his former boyfriends Kenny Goss and Fadi Fawaz. George's sisters Yioda and Melanie were the main beneficiaries with them sharing equally all the major assets and his two London homes. There was also a horse racing stud farm for George's dad Kyriacos as the singer ensured his family was taken care of.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1926 - Irwin Allen Ginsberg: in Newark, New Jersey, Irwin Allen Ginsberg. A leading figure in the Beat Generation, he first met Bob Dylan in 1963 and they remained lifelong friends. In 1971 Ginsberg and Dylan collaborated on a series of poetry readings set to music. Allen Ginsberg is one of the figures in the background for the iconic film promo of Bob Dylan card flipping the lyrics of Subterranean Homesick Blues. Ginsberg died of liver cancer on April 5th, 1997 aged 70.

1936 - Eddie Willis: American soul musician Eddie Willis, who played electric guitar and occasional electric sitar for Motown's in-house studio band, The Funk Brothers, during the 1960s and early 1970s. He performed on many hits including ‘Please Mr. Postman’ by The Marvelettes, ‘The Way You Do the Things You Do’ by The Temptations, ‘You Keep Me Hanging On by The Supremes, and ‘I Was Made to Love Her’ by Stevie Wonder. Willis died on 20 August 2018 aged 82.

1939 - Ian Hunter: English musician Ian Hunter, vocals, guitar with Mott The Hoople, who had the 1972 UK No.3 & US No.37 single 'All The Young Dudes' which was written for them by David Bowie. Other hits include, 'All the Way from Memphis' and 'Roll Away the Stone'. As a solo artist he had the 1975 UK No.14 single 'Once Bitten twice Shy' and later was one half of Hunter Ronson with Mick Ronson. He wrote the book Diary Of A Rock 'n' Roll Star.

1942 - Curtis Mayfield: American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and record producer Curtis Mayfield. He was a member of The Impressions, who had the 1965 US No.7 single 'Lilies Of The Field'. As a solo artist the 1971 UK No.12 single 'Move On Up', and the 1972 US No.4 single 'Freddie's Dead, Theme From Superfly'. He died on December 26th, 1999.

1943 - Michael Clarke: Michael Clarke, drummer, The Flying Burrito Brothers, and The Byrds, who had the 1965 US & UK No.1 single 'Mr. Tambourine Man'. Clarke died of liver failure on December 19th, 1993.

1947 - Mickey Finn: English percussionist Mickey Finn, who with Tyrannosaurus Rex (on one album, A Beard of Stars) and T. Rex scored the 1971 UK No.1 single 'Hot Love', plus over 20 other UK Top 40 singles. Finn died from alcohol-related liver problems on January 11th, 2002.

1947 - Dave Alexander: Dave Alexander, the original bassist for The Stooges. Alexander met Iggy Pop and formed The Stooges in 1967 and had a hand in arranging, composing, and performing all of the songs that appeared on the band's first two albums, The Stooges and Fun House. He was fired from the band in August 1970 after showing up at a gig too drunk to play. He died from pneumonia on 10 February 1975 aged 27.

1950 - Florian Pilkington-Miksa: English drummer who with Curved Air had the 1971 UK No.4 single 'Back Street Luv'. He also has also performed with Kiki Dee. 1950 - Suzi Quatro: American rock singer-songwriter Suzi Quatro, who had the 1973 UK No.1 single 'Can The Can', plus 10 other UK Top 40 singles, and the 1979 US No.4 single with Chris Norman, Stumblin' In'. Quatro was the first female bass player to become a major rock star, breaking a barrier to women's participation in rock music.

1951 - Deniece Williams: American singer-songwriter Deniece Williams, who had the 1978 US No.1 & UK No.3 single with Johnny Mathis 'Too Much Too Little Too Late, and the 1984 US No.1 & UK No.2 single 'Let's Hear It For The Boy'. Worked as a backing singer with Stevie Wonder's group Wonderlove.

1952 - Billy Powell: American musician and a longtime keyboardist of Southern rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd from 1972 until his death in 2009. They had the 1974 US No. 8 single, 'Sweet Home Alabama', 1982 UK No.21 single 'Freebird'). Powell died at the age of 56 of a suspected heart attack in Florida on 28th Jan 2009. Powell called the police saying he was having trouble breathing and emergency services tried to resuscitate the musician but he was pronounced dead an hour later.

1954 - Dan Hill: Canadian pop singer and songwriter Dan Hill who had the 1978 US No.3 & UK No. 13 single 'Sometimes When We Touch' and 'Can't We Try', a duet with Vonda Shepard.

1956 - Danny Wilde: singer, songwriter, from American pop rock duo The Rembrandts, who had the 1990 US Top 20 hit ‘Just the Way It Is, Baby’, and 1995, UK No. 3 single ‘I’ll Be There For You’, Theme from Friends.

1961 - El Debarge: DeBarge, singer from American family group DeBarge who had the 1983 US No.17 single 'All This Love', and the 1985 UK No.4 single 'Rhythm Of The Night'.

1962 - David Cole: David Cole, from American group C+C Music Factory who had the 1991 UK No.4 single 'Things That Make You Go Hmmm..., and the 1991 US No.1 single 'Gonna Make You Sweat'. Cole produced Mariah Carey, Whitney Houston, and Aretha Franklin. Cole died on January 24th, 1995.

1964 - Kerry King: guitarist with American thrash metal band Slayer who released the 1986 album 'Reign in Blood'.

1965 - Mike Gordon: bass, banjo, piano, harmonica, and percussion, from American rock band Phish who is known for musical improvisation, extended jams, and blending of genres. Gordon is also an award-winning filmmaker.

1968 - Samantha Sprackling: a singer with English alternative rock band Republica who had the 1997 UK No.7 single 'Drop Dead Gorgeous' and the single 'Ready to Go'. 1973 - Tonmi Lillman: Finnish musician, best known as Otus, the former drummer of the Finnish hard rock band Lordi.Lillman died on 13 February 2012 after a bout of illness.

1974 - Kelly Jones: vocals, guitar, from Welsh rock band, Stereophonics, who had the 2001 UK No.5 single 'Have A Nice Day. Their 1999 UK No.1 album, Performance, and Cocktails spent 97 weeks on the UK chart.

1985 - Pretty Ricky: Tavion La'Corey Mathis, singer from American R&B/hip hop group Pretty Ricky who scored the 2007 US No.1 album Late Night Special.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe.

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Friday morning, I have realized the music history source I have been using for this post is leaving out a very important part of music's history, it does not include any of the classical or operas that are crucial in shaping music to what it is today. I will be changing my source over the weekend. I will be doing some more research in choosing the best history for music resource (resources) for this post. I myself love classical as well as opera, I apologize to all readers of this post who may have also noticed the complete lack of information on classical and opera music. I will be making this change over the weekend. As for today's post, well you are reading it. I need to make a change before I post anything more about music's history. I have been doing this post, as well as its readers an injustice, music would not be music without opera, or classical, that is a fact. Again I do apologize for the inconvenience to ALL readers. Have a great Friday and a great weekend as well. Take care and stay safe. 

 

P.S. I will be posting from a new source over the weekend. Be safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

This Day In The History Of Music for this Saturday. Here is the link for the new source that I will be using for this post. https://www.onthisday.com/ this will include classical and opera. 

1826: German composer Carl Maria von Weber dies of tuberculosis at age 39.

1942: Capitol Records' first recording session takes place when "The General Jumped at Dawn" by Paul Whiteman's New Yorker Hotel Orchestra is recorded at Radio Recorders Studio in Los Angeles. The record flops, but Capitol soon becomes the most successful record company of the era.

1942: The musical film Yankee Doodle Dandy is released. Starring James Cagney, the film features the song "The Yankee Doodle Boy," based upon "Yankee Doodle," a long-time standard American anthem.

1954: Kitty Kallen's "Little Things Mean A Lot" hits #1. 1956: Gene Vincent releases "Be-Bop-a-Lula."

1956: Elvis Presley appears on The Milton Berle Show where the pair do a comedy bit performing Elvis' "Hound Dog" and "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You." It marks the first TV appearance of The Jordanaires backing up Elvis and the last Milton Berle show for 10 years.

1957: Bill Justis records the instrumental hit "Raunchy."

1958: The first-ever greatest hits compilation, Johnny Mathis' Johnny's Greatest Hits goes #1 in America. It stays on the chart for nine years.  

1959: Robert Zimmerman graduates from Hibbing High School in Minnesota. He moves on to the University of Minnesota but soon leaves for New York City to become the full-time folk singer, Bob Dylan.

1960: Brenda Lee's "I'm Sorry" enters the charts.

1961: Roy Orbison's "Running Scared" hits #1.

1964: The first recording featuring David Bowie is released. He's still known as David Jones when "Liza Jane" by David Jones and the King Bees comes out.

1964: The Rolling Stones play their first show in America when they begin a nine-date tour at the Swing Auditorium in San Bernardino, California.

1966: Gladys Presley, Elvis' mother, awakens suddenly in Memphis, convinced that her boy is in danger; at that moment, Elvis' first pink Cadillac catches on fire while en route from Fulton, Arkansas. Elvis is unharmed.

1968: The Beatles record "Don't Pass Me By."  

1968: Senator Robert Kennedy is shot three times while exiting through a kitchen at a hotel where he delivered a speech after winning the Democratic nomination for president of the United States. This event prompts David Crosby to write "Long Time Gone" and The Rolling Stones to insert the lyrics, "Who killed the Kennedys?" to their new song "Sympathy For The Devil."

1969: The Doors concert documentary Feast Of Friends premieres at the Cinematheque in Los Angeles.

1969: Donovan and Joan Baez perform at a rally for nuclear disarmament in London.

1970: Bob Dylan records "If Dogs Run Free," "Went To See The Gypsy," "What It's All About," "Winterlude," "I Forgot To Remember," "The Man In Me," "Father Of Night," and "Lily Of The West (Flora)."

1971: James Taylor releases "You've Got a Friend."

1972: Maureen McGovern quits her full-time secretarial job in order to follow her dream of being a professional singer.

1974: At a time when just about every photogenic musician with a hit song is getting their own variety show, Bobbie Gentry of "Ode To Billie Joe" joins the fray with The Bobbie Gentry Happiness Hour on CBS.

1974: Sly Stone of Sly and the Family Stone marries his first wife, Kathy Silva, on stage before his show at Madison Square Garden. Bishop Stewart, the singer's uncle, officiates before the crowd of 19,000; Silva files for divorce five months later.

1975: Syd Barrett, ex-Pink Floyd member and founder who was forced from the band after becoming an acid casualty, quietly appears in the Abbey Road studios during recording of the band's album Wish You Were Here, which was largely written about him. No one notices Barrett, and he soon leaves as quietly as he entered.

1976: Cat Stevens performs under that name for the last time, wrapping up his Majikat tour with a show in Thessaloniki, Greece. The next year, he embraces the Islamic faith and changes his name to Yusuf Islam.

1977: Alice Cooper's boa constrictor - a star of his stage show - dies after the rat he is served for breakfast bites him. Cooper holds open auditions for a new snake, eventually choosing one named Angel.

1979: Muddy Waters, 64, marries his third wife, 25-year-old Marva Jean Brooks, in Chicago with Eric Clapton as best man.  

1983: U2 plays the Red Rocks amphitheater in Colorado. Despite the rain, the concert is intimate and energetic; it is later released as a concert film called Under a Blood Red Sky.

1987: Sly Stone (of Sly and the Family Stone) surrenders to authorities in Fort Meyers, Florida, for violating his probation (for cocaine possession).

1987: The Prince's Trust Rock Gala is held for the fifth time at Wembley Arena in London. The annual charity event features the music of George Harrison, who performs "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" with Eric Clapton, and Ringo Starr's version of "With A Little Help From My Friends," featuring Jeff Lynne. Other performers include Elton John, Phil Collins, Dave Edmunds, and Ben E. King.

1988: Pattie Boyd, ex-wife of George Harrison, files for divorce from Eric Clapton, who wrote the song "Layla" about her.

1989: Bill Wyman's Rolling Stones bandmates are among the guests celebrating his wedding to 18-year-old Mandy Smith, which took place three days earlier at a registrar's office. Wyman, 52, started seeing Smith when she was just 13. They separate nine months later.

1989: The Doobie Brothers begin their reunion tour, they're first with their original lineup since 1975.

1990: Jim Hodder (original drummer for Steely Dan), age 42, drowns in the swimming pool of his home in Point Arena, California.  

1993: Mariah Carey marries Tommy Mottola, the music executive who signed her to Columbia Records. The marriage, her first, lasts four years.

1993: Toby Keith scores his first #1 country hit when "Should've Been a Cowboy" reaches the top.

1993: Conway Twitty dies of an abdominal aortic aneurysm at age 59 after collapsing while on tour in Missouri.

1999: Frankie Laine marries his third wife, Marcia Ann Kline.  

2002: Eleven weeks after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Dee Dee Ramone, a founding member of the Ramones, dies of a heroin overdose at age 50.  

2002: R. Kelly is indicted on 21 counts of child pornography, accused of coercing underage girls into sexual acts. Kelly, who in 1994 was briefly married to the 15-year-old singer Aaliyah, was the subject of a Chicago Sun-Times investigation that led to an inquiry by police. The most damning evidence against him is a videotape purporting to show him engaging in lewd acts with a 14-year-old girl. Kelly denies any wrongdoing and claims the man in the video is not him. After posting bail, Kelly resumes his career. He becomes more successful than ever, with a string of Platinum albums, a run of headlining tours, and six Grammy nominations. His trial doesn't begin until 2008; the girl in the video doesn't testify, and some charges against him have been dropped on technicalities. After less than a day of deliberation, the jury returns a verdict of not guilty on all charges. Once again, Kelly goes back to work with few repercussions. He collaborates with a number of big-name artists, Justin Bieber, Mariah Carey, and Chance the Rapper. Lady Gaga, who teamed up with him on her 2013 track "Do What U Want," says, "The thing we have very much in common is that a lot of people write very untrue things about me, and a lot of people write very untrue things about him." Kelly faces more accusations in 2017 when BuzzFeed publishes a story portraying him as leading a kind of sex cult for underage girls. In 2018, the #MuteRKelly campaign gains momentum as a number of women encourages media outlets to drop associations with him. In 2019, Lifetime airs a mini-series called Surviving R. Kelly, detailing further accusations.

2003: Metallica unleashes their album St. Anger, with no guitar solos and one of the harshest drum tones ever committed to tape.  

2004: Jennifer Lopez marries Marc Anthony. The union lasts 10 years and produces two children: twins Max and Emme.

2006: Elliot Easton of The Cars breaks his clavicle when the band's tour bus swerves to avoid an accident, and Easton falls out of the bunk. Performing with "The New Cars" fronted by Todd Rundgren, he plays four shows in a brace before getting surgery, which ends the tour.

2006: "Hard Rock Hallelujah" by Lordi is released in the UK.

2007: Bruce Springsteen releases Live In Dublin.

2012: Blues singer-songwriter Lou Pride, known for the compositions "Long Arm Of The Blues" and "Love From A Stone," dies after a bout of illness at age 68.

2012: Herb Reed (founding member of The Platters) dies of heart disease, among other ailments, at age 83 in Boston, Massachusetts.

2013: Rob Halford announces that Judas Priest will be re-forming after their retirement two years earlier.

2013: Doo-wop singer Marshall Sewell (of The Edsels) dies of esophageal cancer at age 75.

2015: Shania Twain begins her Rock This Country Tour with a show in Seattle. Billed as her farewell tour, it's her first trek since her 2003-2004 Up! tour.

2017: Kesha is rebuffed when she tries to hug Jerry Seinfeld at a red carpet event - turns out he's not a hugger. The video quickly goes viral.

2019: Miley Cyrus plays an exploited pop star in the "Rachel, Jack and Ashley Too" episode of Black Mirror. Her character's hit song is a reworking of "Head Like A Hole" as an empowerment anthem called "On A Roll," which is released as a single in real life with a video that gets over 20 million views on YouTube.

Born On This Day In The Music World:

1981: Sebastien Lefebvre (rhythm guitarist for Simple Plan) is born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

1979: Pete Wentz of Fall Out Boy is born in Wilmette, Illinois.

1974: Aaron "P-Nut" Wills (bassist for 311) is born in Indianapolis, Indiana.

1971: Mark "Marky Mark" Wahlberg is born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, where he's the youngest of nine children, including older brother Donnie (future member of New Kids on the Block).

1970: Claus Norreen (guitarist for Aqua) is born in Charlottenlund, Denmark.

1969: Brian McKnight is born in Buffalo, New York.  

1956: Richard Butler (lead singer of The Psychedelic Furs) is born in Kingston upon the Thames, London, England.

1956: Kenny G is born Kenneth Gorelick in Seattle, Washington.

1954: Jazz drummer Pete Erskine (of Weather Report) is born in Somers Point, New Jersey.

1952: Iron Maiden drummer Nicko McBrain is born Michael Henry McBrain outside of London, England.

1950: Ronnie Dyson, an actor-turned-singer known for his breakout role in the Broadway production of Hair and his hit single "(If You Let Me Make Love To You Then) Why Can't I Touch You?," is born in Washington, DC, though he'll grow up in Brooklyn, New York.

1947: Laurie Anderson is born in Glen Ellyn, Illinois. 1947: Badfinger guitarist Tom Evans is born in Liverpool, England.

1946: Freddie Stone (co-founder of Sly & the Family Stone) is born Frederick Stewart in Vallejo, California.

1945: Don Reid (lead singer of The Statler Brothers) is born in Staunton, Virginia.

1937: R&B singer Floyd Butler (of The Friends Of Distinction) is born in California.

1932: Pete Jolly is born in New Haven, Connecticut. The jazz pianist and accordionist is known for his work in film and television, including The Love Boat, M*A*S*H, and Dallas.

1925: Singer/actor Bill Hayes is born in Harvey, Illinois. Known for his long-running role as Doug Williams on Days of Our Lives and his chart-topping rendition of "The Ballad of Davy Crockett."

1922: Jazz drummer Gordon "Specs" Powell is born in New York.

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MOHLovesAlaska

MOHLovesAlaska
Platinum Certified

Good Sunday afternoon, I hope your weekend has been treating you great thus far. I would also like for you to know, I will be using both sources for this post. They are the best for all that I have read, however, they are also very different as far as information about the history of music. By me combining the two we will have a greater insight into the history of music. Completing the post will be a long process, as will the reading of all the information that each post will have. In the end, I believe it will be a better read. At least that is my hope. Enjoy the rest of your Sunday. 

 

1931: "There Ought To Be A Moonlight Saving Time" by Guy Lombardo hits #1

1960: " TV Personality, Comedian and Composer Steve Allen and the Steve Allen Show" last airs on NBC-TV.

1962: The Beatles meet their producer George Martin for the first time and record "Besame Mucho" with Pete Best on drums.

1962: The Beatles The first Beatles recording session took place at Abbey Road Studios. The group recorded four tracks, one of which was 'Love Me Do' the four musicians received payments for the session of £7.10 ($12.07) each.  

1964: The Beatles arrive in the Netherlands.  

1965: The Rolling Stones released the single ’(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction in the US, which went on to give the band their first No.1. In the UK, (where it was released in August 1966), the song initially played only on pirate radio stations because its lyrics were considered too sexually suggestive.  

1966: Roy Orbison's first wife, Claudette, was killed when a truck pulled out of a side road and collided with the motorbike that she and her husband were riding on in Gallatin, Texas, she was 25.  

1968: Screaming Lord Sutch appeared at the Freehold Hullabaloo in Freehold, New Jersey, (Sutch was touring the East Coast in an old custom-painted Rolls Royce ‘hearse’). The support band was The Castiles (with Bruce Springsteen on vocals).  

1969: Elton John released his debut album Empty Sky in the UK, (released January 1975 in the US). 'Skyline Pigeon' is the best-known song on the album, and is the only one which John, albeit infrequently, performs as part of his live shows.  

1970: Christie was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Yellow River. Written by band leader Jeff Christie, the song was offered to The Tremeloes, who recorded it with the intention of releasing it as a single. However, they considered it too pop-orientated for their future direction. Producer Mike Smith, therefore, took their vocals off the recording and added those of Jeff Christie.  

1970: Pink Floyd Syd Barrett played his first gig since leaving Pink Floyd at the Extravaganza 70, at London's Olympia Hall, England, backed by a band that included his old friend Floyd guitarist, David Gilmour. Barrett baffled the audience (and his musicians) when he abruptly took off his guitar during the fourth number and walked off stage.  

1971: John Lennon & Yoko jammed live on stage with Frank Zappa at The Filmore East in New York. Some of these recordings were released in 1972, on John Lennon's third post-Beatles album, Some Time in New York City.  

1972: David Bowie releases his breakthrough album "The Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars".   

1974: Dolly Parton RCA Records released 'I Will Always Love You by Dolly Parton, the second single from Parton's thirteenth solo studio album, Jolene. Recorded on June 13, 1973, the singer wrote the song for her one-time partner and mentor Porter Wagoner, from whom she was professionally splitting at the time.  

1979: Def Leppard played at Crookes Workingman's Club in Sheffield. The gig was reviewed in the UK music paper 'Sounds' and led to a recording contract with Phonogram Records.  

1983: 17th Music City News Country Awards: Marty Robbins & Roy Acuff win.  

1986: "Storms of Life" debut album by Randy Travis is released (Billboard Album of the Year, 1987).  

1986: A&R man **ahem** Rowe died of diabetes. Rowe became famous for not signing The Beatles to Decca records and made the classic quote 'Nobody cares about guitar groups anymore.' He did however sign The Rolling Stones to Decca.  

1987: Whitney Houston had her second UK No.1 single with 'I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)'. It reached No.1 in over a dozen other countries and won a Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance in 1988.  

1987: Michael Jackson announced that he was breaking all ties with the Jehovah's Witnesses. Jackson had been raised as a Jehovah's Witness and would don disguises and go door to door with the Watchtower message in cities where he was performing.  

1988: 22nd Music City News Country Awards: Randy Travis & Statler Brothers win.  

1994: 28th Music City News Country Awards: Alan Jackson & Ray Stevens win.  

1998: B*Witched scored their first UK No.1 single with 'C'est La Vie, making them the seventh act in chart history to debut at No.1. Also today, Boyzone scored their third UK No.1 album with 'Where We Belong', it was also the first time in chart history that both the No.1 positions were by Irish acts.  

1999: Australian filmmaker Baz Luhrmann went to No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Everybody's Free (To Wear Sunscreen)'. Actor Lee Perry read the narrative. The backing is the choral version of 'Everybody's Free (To Feel Good)', a 1991 song by Rozalla, used in the film William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet.  

2003: Keyboard player with The Animals Dave Rowberry died aged 62. He replaced Alan Price who left in 1965. The Animals had the 1964 UK & US No.1 single 'House Of The Rising Sun'.  

2003: A High court judge in London ruled that rap lyrics should be treated as a foreign language after admitting that he was unsure of the meaning of 'shizzle my nizzle' and 'mish mish man.' The court battle was over a copyright issue between the Ant'ill Mob and the Heartless Crew who had used the lyrics on a remix.  

2005: John Bonham was voted at No. 1 in Classic Rock Magazine's '50 Greatest Drummers in Rock' listing Moby **ahem** as Bonham's defining moment. During live sets with Zeppelin his drum solo Moby **ahem** would often last for half an hour and regularly featured the use of his bare hands.  

2006: Billy Preston died of kidney failure. The Grammy-winning keyboard player collaborated with some of the greatest names in the music industry, including The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Nat King Cole, Little Richard, Ray Charles, George Harrison, Elton John, Eric Clapton, and Bob Dylan.  

2008: Ki McPhail and Owen Doyle from Busted lost their £10m royalties battle. The former band members claimed they were forced to sign away their rights before being sacked from the band in October 2001. The pair said they wrote songs with the two other band members James Bourne and Matt Willis, including 'Year 3000' and 'What I Go To School For', when the group formed in 2001, but the judge in the case, Mr. Justice Morgan, dismissed their claims and criticized the evidence they gave.  

2010: Marvin Isley the youngest member of the American R&B band, the Isley Brothers, died, aged 56. Marvin Isley, who was the group's bass player, stopped performing in 1996 because of complications from diabetes, including the loss of his legs.  

2012: Adam Clayton's former personal assistant and housekeeper went on trial, accused of stealing almost 3m euros (£2.4m) from the U2 bass player. Carol Hawkins, from Dublin, pleaded not guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to 181 counts of theft. She was accused of stealing money from two of Clayton's bank accounts over a four-year period from 2004 to 2008. According to the latest Sunday Times Rich List, Bono, the Edge, Larry Mullen, Mr. Clayton, and their manager had a combined fortune of €628m, ($788m).  

2012: 46th CMT Music Awards: Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert & Luke Bryan win.  

2015: Singer Ronnie Gilbert, a member of the influential 1950s Folk quartet The Weavers, passed away at the age of 88. At the height of their popularity, the quartet sold millions of records and are most often remembered for 'On Top Of Old Smoky', 'Kisses Sweeter Than Wine', and 'Rock Island Line'.  

2017: Korean singer T.O.P is rushed to hospital after a suspected overdose while serving mandatory military service.  

2017: The site of the 1969 Woodstock music festival was officially recognized for its place in history when Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that Bethel Woods Center for the Arts had been placed on the National Register of Historic Places.  

2019: American singer and songwriter Dr. John is known for music combining blues, pop, jazz, boogie-woogie, and rock and roll died at the age of 77 after suffering a heart attack. Born Malcolm John Rebennack his career started in the late 1950s when he became prominent as a pianist and singer on the New Orleans music scene. He also worked with the Rolling Stones, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Neil Diamond, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton, Bob Seger, and Joe Walsh.  

Born On This Day In the Music World:  

1661: Giacomo Antonio Perti, Italian composer, born in Bologna, Italy (d. 1756)

1676: Georg Riedel, German composer, born in Königsberg, Germany (d. 1738)

1735: Anton Schweitzer, German composer, born in Coburg, Germany (d. 1787)

1804: Petter Conrad Boman, Swedish composer, born in Stockholm, Sweden (d. 1861)

1807: Adrien-François Servais, Belgian composer, born in Halle, Belgium (d. 1866)

1815: Francesco Antonio Norberto Pinto, Portuguese violinist, hornist and composer (Adoração ao Sol), born in Lisbon, Portugal (d. 1860)

1819: William Howard Glover, English composer, born in London, England (d. 1875)

1840: John Stainer, English composer (The Crucifixion), born in Southwark, London (d. 1901)

1869: Siegfried Wagner, German opera composer and conductor, born in Tribschen, Lucerne, Switzerland (d. 1930)

1890: Ted Lewis [Theodore Leopold Friedman], American entertainer, bandleader and musician ("Is Everybody Happy?"), born in Circleville, Ohio (d. 1971)

1891: István Kardos, Hungarian composer, born in Debrecen, Hungary (d. 1975)

1893: Ludovic Feldman, Romanian composer, born in Galați, Romania (d. 1987)

1894: Sabin Drăgoi, Romanian composer, born in Seliște, Romania (d. 1968)

1898: Ninette de Valois [Edris Stannus], British ballerina (Royal Ballet), born in Blessington, Ireland (d. 2001)

1902: Avraham Daus, Israeli composer, born in Berlin (d. 1974)

1902: Jimmie Lunceford, American saxophonist, and bandleader, born in Fulton, Mississippi (d. 1947)

1903: Aram Khachaturian, Soviet composer (Gayane; Sabre Dance), born in Tbilisi, Georgia (d. 1978)

1905: John Gart, Russian orchestra leader (Paul Winchell Show), born in Russia (d. 1989)

1910: To**ahem**sugu Ogiwara, Japanese composer, born in Osaka, Japan (d. 1992)

1915: Vincent Persichetti, American composer (Sibyl), born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (d. 1987)

1922: Ian Hamilton, Scottish composer, born in Glasgow, Scotland (d. 2000)

1923: Allan Wicks, British cathedral organist and choral conductor (Canterbury, 1961-88), born in Harden, England (d. 2010)

1924: Serge Nigg, French composer, born in Paris (d. 2008)

1925: Al Grey, American jazz trombonist (Count Basie Orchestra; Snap Your Fingers), born in Aldie, Virginia (d. 2000)

1926: Klaus Tennstedt, German conductor (Fidelio), born in Merseburg, Germany (d. 1998)

1929: Bogusław Schaffer, Polish composer, and playwright, born in Lviv, Ukraine (d. 2019) [1]

1931: Lloyd Lindroth, American harpist, The Liberace of the Harp, born in Seattle, Washington (d. 1994)

1935: Misha Mengelberg, Dutch jazz pianist and composer (Reconstruction), born in Kiev, Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (d. 2017)

1935: Grant Green, American jazz guitarist, born in St. Louis (d. 1979)

1936: Levi Stubbs [Stubbles], American baritone singer (The Four Tops - "It's the Same Old Song"; "Standing In The Shadows of Love"), born in Detroit, Michigan (d. 2008)

1939: Gary U.S. Bonds [Anderson], American blues singer and songwriter (New Orleans), born in Jacksonville, Florida

1939: Louis Andriessen, Dutch composer (Reconstruction), born in Utrecht, Netherlands

1939: Richard "Popcorn" Wylie, American R&B and soul pianist, bandleader, songwriter, and record producer, born in Detroit, Michigan (d. 2008)

1940: Phillip Rhodes, American composer, born in Forest City, North Carolina

1942: Howard "Howie" Kane [Kirshenbaum], American rock singer (Jay and the Americans - "Come a Little Bit Closer")

1944: Edgar Froese, German musician (Tangerine Dream), born in Tilsit, East Prussia (d. 2015)

1944: Peter Albin, American rock bassist and guitar player (Big Brother and the Holding Company), born in San Francisco, California

1946: Tony Levin, American bassist and Chapman Stick player (King Crimson; Peter Gabriel; Paul Simon; Asia), born in Boston, Massachusetts

1947: Terry Williams, American singer-songwriter, and guitarist (The First Edition - "Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)"), born in Hollywood, California

1948: Richard Sinclair, British progressive rock bassist, singer, guitarist, and songwriter (Caravan -"In the Land of Grey and Pink"), born in Canterbury, England

1949: Edgar Warren Williams, American composer, born in Orlando, Florida

1949: Holly Near, American folksinger, actress, and activist, born in Ukiah, California

1951: Dwight Twilley, American power pop singer-songwriter ("I'm On Fire"; "Girls"), born in Tulsa, Oklahoma

1952:Yukihiro Takahashi, Japanese pop-rock drummer and singer (Yellow Magic Orchestra), born in Meguro, Tokyo, Japan

1957: Junior [Norman Giscombe], British R&B singer ("Mama Used to Say"), born in London, England

1959: Jimmy Jam [James Harris], American songwriter and record producer (Janet Jackson), born in Minneapolis, Minnesota

1960: Steve Vai, American rock guitarist, and composer (Frank Zappa; David Lee Roth Band; Whitesnake), born in Carle Place, New York

1960: Pelle Alsing, Swedish drummer (Roxette - "Listen to Your Heart"), born in Vantörs Församling, Sweden (d. 2020)

1961: Dee C. Lee [Diane Catherine Sealy], British rock musician (Wham!, Style Council), born in London, England

1961: Tom Araya, Chilean-American heavy metal bass guitarist and lead singer (Slayer), born in Viña del Mar, Chile

1961: Nir Brand, Israeli conductor, and musician, born in Beersheba, Israel 1964 Paul "Guru" Josh, British musician (Infinity), born in London, England (d. 2015)

1965: David White, British pop-rock guitarist (Brother Beyond - "Can You Keep a Secret?"), born in Highbury, London, England

1966: Sean Yseult [Shauna Reynolds], American rock bassist (White Zombie - "More Human Than Human"), born in Raleigh, North Carolina

1968: Alan Licht, American avant-garde and pop guitarist, composer, and journalist, born in New Jersey

1969: Douglas Lee Mitchell, American heavy metal artist (Southgang), born in Miles, Michigan

1970: James Shaffer, American rock guitarist (Korn - "Here To Stay"), born in Rosedale, California

1972: Cristina Scabbia, Italian gothic metal singer-songwriter (Lacuna Coil), born in Milan, Italy

1974: Uncle Kracker [Matthew Shafer], American singer and rapper ("Follow Me"; "Drift Away"), born in Mount Clemens, Michigan

1975: Cheer Chen [Chi-Chen], Taiwanese folk-rock singer-songwriter (Sofa Sea), born in Taipei, Taiwan

1976: Aikido [Kim Gaboury], Canadian musician (Dancing in Chains), born in Quebec City, Quebec

1978: Carl Barât, English rock singer (The Libertines; Dirty Pretty Things), born in Basingstoke, North Hampshire, England

1978: Mariana Popova, Bulgarian pop singer ("Dream About Me"), born in Sofia, Bulgaria

1978: Jeremy Gara, Canadian drummer (Arcade Fire), born in Ottawa, Ontario

1987: Kyle Falconer, Scottish musician

1992: Pierce Fulton, American electronic dance music DJ and record producer ("Runaway"; "Better Places"), born in Vermont (d. 2021).

Until sometime tomorrow, take care and stay safe. 

MOHLovesAlaska